Posts Tagged ‘balance’

Truth and Stories

June 6, 2018

flame

There is an expression for communicating among humans– ‘breaking news’.   It refers to very fresh, not old, information that is sufficiently significant that the old reality, the older news, will be changed by it.  Like a newborn emerging from its eggshell it presents a fresh perspective upon our shared world.

Often our view of the world is a bit stale and habitual. Habits are a source of comfort , as old friends.  However, since things constantly change with the passage of time, it may be necessary to freshen up our grasp of reality, of truth itself, if our position isn’t comfy anymore, if our rear ends sag too near the road upon the life path.

What do you take as a ‘given’ that might not be so?  Is there anything that simply won’t ‘come true’ no matter how hard you believe it?  Have you begun to no longer trust your own thoughts, your own feelings, maybe your own senses?  Danger, danger!  No matter how the New Agers sell the power of ‘manifesting your perfect life’.  it has to be do-able here upon the Earth-Mother. 

It may be time to still yourself, ground yourself, reconnect with your own heart and soul, where in truth we are already part of perfection.  Make certain that the news you pass along is truth.

There is also a Druid slogan, ‘Truth against the world.’  That truth is known as Awen,  insight into the eternal and immutable.  All things that manifest can only do so to the extent that they are part of that Truth.  Check it against inner Awen, if you have come across it out in the World.

 

Salman Rushdie has written things that ring true, even presented as fiction, enough to perturb many people whose perspectives are a bit rigid.  He wrote recently about the dilemma of #fakenews  that can get its readers or listeners confused about how our world actually is.  Those who shout loudest that something is #fakenews may actually want us to instead stop thinking and trust the brand of expertise or authority they are touting at the moment.

 

“I have argued, for much of my life as a writer, that the breakdown in the old agreements about reality is now the most significant reality, and that the world can perhaps best be explained in terms of conflicting and often incompatible narratives. In Kashmir and in the Middle East, and in the battle between progressive America and Trumpistan, we see examples of such incompatibilities. I have also maintained that the consequences of this new, argumentative, even polemical attitude to the real has profound implications for literature—that we can’t, or ought not to, pretend it isn’t there. I believe that the influence on public discourse of more, and more varied, voices has been a good thing, enriching our literatures and making more complex our understanding of the world.

“And yet I now face, as we all do, a genuine conundrum. How can we argue, on the one hand, that modern reality has become necessarily multidimensional, fractured and fragmented, and, on the other hand, that reality is a very particular thing, an unarguable series of things that are so, which needs to be defended against the attacks of, to be frank, the things that are not so, which are being promulgated by, let’s say, the Modi Administration in India, the Brexit crew in the U.K., and the President of the United States? How to combat the worst aspects of the Internet, that parallel universe in which important information and total garbage coexist, side by side, with, apparently, the same levels of authority, making it harder than ever for people to tell them apart? How to resist the erosion in the public acceptance of “basic facts,” scientific facts, evidence-supported facts about, say, climate change or inoculations for children? How to combat the political demagoguery that seeks to do what authoritarians have always wanted—to undermine the public’s belief in evidence, and to say to their electorates, in effect, “Believe nothing except me, for I am the truth”? What do we do about that? And what, specifically, might be the role of art, and the role of the literary arts in particular?”

Salman Rushdie

We tell a story of ourselves by the very act of living our lives each day.  Nimue Brown has written about that recently, too.  Because we live with other humans, and in fact need to do it that way,  there is always a balancing act between their realities and ours.  Sometimes, they conflict badly enough that one story will try to over-write another.  Danger, Danger again!  How much of your own truth are you willing to amend just to keep the peace?

“People will fight and kill to protect their stories and their take on reality, even when those stories are clearly harming them. As the person breaking the story, you are perhaps more likely to be seen as the destructive oppressor, and not the rescuing angel you may imagine yourself to be. Those still in the story may simply recast you so that they can keep the story going. “You used to be such a nice little girl. I don’t know what went wrong.”

“Sometimes, the only way out of a story is to break away from the people whose story it is. Sometimes, the only option is to play the role consciously and then escape into spaces where you can properly be yourself. Sometimes to do that, a safe house is required, a new identity, police protection. Sometimes you have to ask difficult questions about the price of your relationships, and the implications of leaving them. People can die as a consequence of misjudging this.

“If you call out a story as a lie, even if you can evidence it, people may fight you. They may fire you, take you to court, lie about you, attack you on social media. They may deprive you of key resources. If you refuse to play your allotted role you may be harassed, ridiculed, threatened or abandoned. You have no control over how other people respond when you stop acting in line with their story.

“But you have the right to live your own life, and you have the right to be safe. So, if you’re wrecking a story, plan your escape routes first – more or less literally as required. Do some risk assessment. Consider the consequences. Try to break the story as calmly as you can, with minimal drama. There is nothing like drama to keep a story moving, because even as you think you’re resisting it, you can find the energy of it being sucked in and used to reinforce the existing story. You were always a useless child. Now you’re upsetting everyone with this stupid idea that you can do something. It’s all your fault… These are the outcomes to avoid.

“It’s natural to want justice, to want recognition. It’s reasonable to want the people who have miscast you to realise their mistakes. It’s also very likely that you won’t get that. If you choose to stay and fight, you may be pulled back into the old story. Sometimes, it is better to go quietly and start a new story of your own somewhere else.”

Nimue Brown  

Sometimes another person is so afraid of your view that they insist upon calling you wrong, or a ‘bad guy’, even insisting that what you see with your own eyes, hear with your own ears, is not so.  Danger, Danger yet again.   If your own senses cannot be relied upon you are severely crippled for handling living. Best to stay true to them, and to yourself, and get far away from one who can only thwart you.  They are ‘gas-lighting’. If you remain with this person,  soon everything will be labeled as your fault.  It never helps to feel that way;  the person who constantly refuses to take responsibility for their own truth will try to get another to do it for them.

The world is our teacher.  Sometimes it is our culture that presents itself, other times we can go right to the Source, to Nature.  Nature has no bias.  No matter what direction a culture may sway us, Nature will not care.  The better a culture harmonizes with Nature, the more successful it proves.  But too often cultures are ossified and losing touch with Nature; they are the ones that are most concerned with the obedience of individuals.

It is one thing to observe and to learn, and another to be a mere follower who depends on the views of another.  If your world has become a prison of fears and prejudices,  it’s time for an open door policy and a good sweeping out.

The Third Reich built its powers by scapegoating minorities and poisoning the public opinion to allow for atrocities against ‘lesser’ populations. Secrecy shielded the worst of the genocide from ordinary citizens. Lies of omission were very common.

Truth is not meant to be hidden.  There is nothing to be ashamed of.  If you have anything in your story that you think you need to hide, please heal it.  If someone else in your world gives you shame for a thing,  do not accept that present.  Or if you find it has been delivered, put it in the compost.

“In Germany, after the Second World War, the authors of what was called Trümmerliteratur, or “rubble literature,” felt the need to rebuild their language, poisoned by Nazism, as well as their country, which lay in ruins. They understood that reality, truth, needed to be reconstructed from the ground up, with new language, just as the bombed cities needed to be rebuilt. I think we can learn from their example. We stand once again, though for different reasons, in the midst of the rubble of the truth. And it is for us—writers, thinkers, journalists, philosophers—to undertake the task of rebuilding our readers’ belief in reality, their faith in the truth. And to do it with new language, from the ground up.”

Salman Rushdie

If you find yourself unsure about a story which is not presented as fiction, but as truth,  be careful of it.  Even the people you trust can be fooled.  Try tossing it all against the wall and see what sticks.

adfsigil

peace, peace, peace

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Value — of a nail

March 7, 2018

Step Up and Be Helpful: Full Moon in Virgo 2018 –KOSMIC MIND

For want of a nail, the shoe was lost.

For want of a shoe, the foot was lost.

For want of a foot, the horse was lost.

For want of a horse, the rider was lost.

For want of a rider, the message was lost.

For want of a message, the company was lost.

For want of a company, the battle was lost.

For want of a battle the kingdom was lost.

And all for the want of a horse shoe nail.

 

From this, as a young person, I concluded that the best way to make myself useful to the world might be to supply horse shoe nails, as it were.   That is, simple necessities that are needed all the time may not have flashy heroic regard paid to them, but they still count as part of the great net of how things function.

Also, to continue with the example of the nail,  there is method to be followed regarding the business of creating them, distributing them,  researching them…  The joy of finding which sorts of nail are strongest, do their duty best, are easiest to make in quantity, how to pound them in a thousand artistic ways?   Is there a dance of supply and demand in the dispatch of shipments of nails to where they are needed, a surplus to be earned from this service that is in sustainable balance?  How have nails changed over the ages; what is their history, can we find ancient nails and enshrine them in museums of nails?

As a young person I loved to make vessels. I made them from paper and fabric and ceramic.  Ceramic and glass especially intrigued me; there is an entire alchemical transformation of dug clay, mixed to a recipe, put into solution, dried and then kneaded and shaped into containers for all number of things, even the vacuity of the interior itself, made impermeable by fire, solids made molten and then cooled into a new state of beauty.  I loved making things that worked well and also expressed an ideal of utility and elegance that had previously been only in my own mind.

The problem was,  in our present civilization, we have an awful lot of things right at hand.  Mass production also can be a fount of excellent design.  There really was not much need for me to keep making more ceramic vessels because all around me were thousands of lovely, well-made, sturdy pots and cups and saucers and basins and on and on.  Frankly, by the time I was able to make similar items from scratch, to a satisfying level of excellence, factories would have belched out warehouses full of the same or better.  I guess it’s better to do the appreciating and the distributing of existing vessels.

So that is what I do mostly now.  I find lovely and serviceable vessels and collect them for a low price and put them for sale at antiques mall.  Of course, I’d be glad to keep them all for myself if I had a giant domicile with a dozen empty rooms, my own museum, but I don’t.  The antiques mall booth is that storage room, where now and then someone will see the beauty in the items that I did and adopt them.

But the rules of an antique mall decree that all items must have a price tag.  And here is my blind spot.  I cannot help thinking that all values such as these are arbitrary.  The best I can do is go online, see what similar items are selling for on ebay or etsy or the department store, and estimate from there.  There’s also depreciation for wear, which must be balanced by the thing’s rarity and demand for it.

One nice part of the booth is that I don’t have to interact with those who buy.  My experiences in sales as both buyer and seller are not pleasant.  Though I have read about the traditional ‘haggling’ culture and the back and forth, it’s so full of lies. People start out asking for too much, and offering too little, and tongue-wrestle the stranger they have probably never met before into folding to their will through taking less than they wanted to.  I was raised in a culture without haggling, and it makes me very unhappy to pretend I want something that I really don’t.

Once, I was in a tight spot, abandoned and pregnant, and I had to sell my big down comforter for food.  I put a free ad in a local paper and got an offer.  The person came to my home and began to offer me less and less money for it.  I was outraged!  I knew they wanted the comforter, but they seemed to think that my selling it for half its value was insufficient?  Finally I said sorry, but I absolutely cannot accept less than this amount.  And it was such a tiny amount too, but they had struck fear into me that they would not buy the thing and I would not have food.  It was disgusting to see the greedy joy on this person’s face when I was made to settle for a fraction of what I’d paid for it when new.

Obviously the whole point was to triumph in this manner, not to help me to live through my difficulty.  It left such a bad taste in my mouth I could hardly handle the cash I was given. It felt slimy.

The legends of the sidhe are full of people trapped into bargains, often when they didn’t even realize what was going on in the minds of these ‘other’ beings who think in their own ways.  Like the stock market, fairy gold melts away the next day into a pile of leaves.

Leaves are all very well to creatures that need them to live in, or to turn into mushroom food, but it wasn’t what you imagined at all, was it?

And what value do we give that long pin of iron or steel with one pointed end, known as a nail?  Sometimes, you just need one, and not a paper clip or a twist-tie or a staple or a screw.  The ‘good folk’ on the other hand would have no use for it ever, due to the material.  And while I might have a bucket full of nails at one place,  they might not be where I need a nail at any given moment.  Scarcity and demand are local.   The value of the horse shoe nail in the shoe, on the hoof, is far greater than the same nail all alone in the dirt of the road.

Sociologist Max Weber stated that ‘dirt is matter misplaced.’   The nail in the road is equal in value to the rest of the stones and dust in the road, as far as the road is concerned.  But if someone comes along, picks up the nail, and makes it into jewelry to ward off mischievous elves, or finds agates in the gravel and polishes them into gemstones (as we used to do when I was young), the value changes again.

Some people spend quite a lot of energy on putting things into different sorts of order, sometimes just to quantify, other times because certain things are needed more than other things, maybe on another continent.  Spice merchants will take the harvest of the plants of an Indonesian wayside and trade them for great amounts of gold or other currency on the other side of the ocean.

I don’t know what things are worth, except when I don’t have them and find I need them.

That’s why the prices are higher at the ‘convenience’ store.  Such small things as a nail or two can make all the difference, and so they are six times as dear to the desperate on a national holiday in the middle of the night in a storm.

The parents of Rapunzel sold her to a witch in exchange for her safe birth, when her mother craved a certain food during gestation, and the witch had some.   These otherworldly beings really bargain hard.   So what if you trade your cow for a handful of beans and they don’t grow?  What if they look like gold and the next day they look like a pile of dead leaves?

Luckily I have plenty of pots and cups and basins to hold them.

 

crazywisdom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring Cleaning yoga

March 1, 2018

This is a re-post from earlier in the Druid blog, which was inspired by finding the article below.   Be certain to follow the link to my original article, inset, as well as checking out the hints in Om Times.

 

 

The Key to Removing Unwanted Entities https://omtimes.com/2016/07/key-removing-unwanted-entities/

Helgaleena

Image

From Chakra Healing and Karmic Awareness by Keith Sherwood (2005 Llewellyn Publications, St. Paul Mn USA)  :

“Below you will find a series of commitments that will sever your links to non-physical beings outside your energy field… and will bring you in accord with the will of the Self as it emerges through your higher and lower mind. In addition, these commitments will safeguard your energy field from any further intrusions of non-physical beings by strengthening your boundaries on all worlds anbd dimensions, including the world of spirit, intellect, soul, lower mind, world of the chakras, and the levels of the splenic chakras.

If you know it’s appropriate to make these commitments and you know you will keep them permanently, then simply read the commitments below, repeat them out loud, and affirm, “I agree to these three commitments.”

The first is:

“If  I have given permission or inadvertently given…

View original post 480 more words

Listening to the Thoughts of the Forest ; Undark guest repost

February 8, 2018

https://undark.org/article/listening-to-the-thoughts-of-the-forest/

Listening to the Thoughts of the Forest

The fate of a Tennessee forest was weighed in a boardroom by an assembly of businessmen, lawyers, and scientists. They never listened to the trees.

 

excerpt:

“The meeting yielded a memorandum of understanding and a press release. The corporation agreed to stop converting native forests to plantations. In print, all parties congratulated one another. The governor added a supportive statement. By the standards of a technocratic world, this was a success, albeit one whose effects were mitigated over the following decade by fluctuations in newsprint pulp prices, mill closings, corporate mergers, and divestment of land. Now, a dozen years after this 2005 agreement, pressure to convert forests to plantations continues in the southeastern U.S. The chasm between the people in the room persists, as does our collective deafness to the forest.

“It is perhaps absurd to suggest that lawyers, scientists, lobbyists, and MBAs spend more of their time listening to trees, smelling the leaf litter, visiting paper mills, and talking to one another in the woods and the logging yards. In a data-driven world, one governed by quantifiable financial and scientific information, a practice of open-ended listening and bodily engagement seems out of place, a diversion or an irrelevance. But financial and scientific data are abstractions. The forest is not made of abstractions. It is not even made of separate, interacting objects. The forest is instead made of relationship. To enter this gargantuan conversation is to connect our bodies and brains to creatures and processes beyond ourselves. This is ecological “big data” wired directly into human cellular and cultural networks.

“It is time, then, for some unconventional in-service training: immersion in the forest’s mind. No polished shoes under tables, no soil-covering marble slabs, no slides of graphs delivered like slap shots at a goal. Instead, let us become sommeliers of forest soils (smell the varied overtones of ascomycete), tree-listeners (what crackle of drought do we hear in twigs, what rustle of unmade paper in the pine?), and interlocutors of root tips, bird memories, and human experience. We do so not to unearth ourselves into mysticism or to run away from disagreements in boardrooms. Rather, listening in the woods is a radical — radix, from the root — form of empiricism.”

guest repost: the ‘return’ of Druidry

January 14, 2018

http://orderofthemorrigan.com/the-return-of-druidry/

There are many sorts of Druid, and many things that in my opinion ought to be called Druid and are not.  This Grove invented itself from the earth up.  gl

When you can choose to disbelieve By Nimue Brown –guest post

December 30, 2017

Most times when I re-post my fellow Druid author’s blogging, I give you only a taste of the whole here.  This time it’s the entire thing. She’s put it very succinctly and thoroughly.  The medicine for disbelief is TRUTH (awen).  The cure is to combine truth with BELIEF.  

BELIEVE  in the experiences of others.  Believe in your own true experience.  Believe in the future as it comes.  The future is woven not from disbelief but from belief.  Disbelief is a way of not facing what unfolds, and also disables our ability to deal with things.

When you can choose to disbelieve By Nimue Brown

There are a great many things that are subject to disbelief. Racial hatred, abuse and harassment, sexual hatred abuse and harassment, the practical and social difficulties grinding down the disabled, and the relentless misery of being poor. If I’m online any day, the odds are I’ll see someone questioning that these things happen, disbelieving victims and sufferers and offering alternative explanations.

The option to disbelieve comes from not being affected personally. So many people are so easily persuaded that if they haven’t seen it, it doesn’t happen. This means that when others try and tell them what happens, they ignore the evidence in favour of their belief, and so they still don’t see it happening.

Disbelief is most often followed by shaming and blaming. The feckless poor with their cigarettes and alcohol. The women who bring it upon themselves by having bodies and clothes and going outside. The disabled people who aren’t trying hard enough to magic themselves well. I think the worst of this is what comes up over race to try and explain away brutality, oppression and a rigged game designed to be unwinnable if you’re from the ‘wrong’ group. Often this is the worst of it because poverty is usually in there too, and the other things on the list can and do feature.

Disbelief means taking no responsibility. It means there’s no pressure to look either at your own behaviour or about the way you participate in a culture that allows this. Disbelief affirms the feeling that all your good things come from your hard work and virtue. You’re too clever to be raped, to get sick, to become poor. The illusion of safety and of being in control are comforting things.

Disbelief is also another form of misery to heap onto those already in trouble. Not only are you dealing with some vile thing, but you’re doing it surrounded by people who tell you it does not exist, is not happening, does not happen. You’ve made it up to get attention (because there’s so much glory, wealth and power to be obtained by admitting you were abused, right?). You’re lying. You’re trying to get out of something or get something for nothing or get special treatment. You’re a snowflake. You’re to blame. And when you’ve already been knocked down by something, dealing with people who refuse to believe it even exists is ghastly.

If people around you deny your reality, say your experience doesn’t exist or is your fault, that way lies madness. Being told you are the cause of the abuse you have suffered crushes your sense of self, takes away your self esteem, may make you question your own experience and your right to feel about it as you do. And of course if all you ever see is people denying that your problem is a real problem, you’ll be less likely to call it out in the first place.

If you’ve been there, it isn’t a belief issue. If you’ve seen it, you know it happens. You don’t have to question why someone would say something like that. You don’t try to figure out how it was their fault, because you know what happens. Disbelief is a luxury available only to those who do not know.

From the ‘crisis of perception’ to the ‘systems view of life’: Guest post on sustainable thinking

December 3, 2017

https://medium.com/age-of-awareness/from-the-crisis-of-perception-to-the-systems-view-of-life-df6973a754a3   by  Daniel Christian Wahl

excerpt:

“After initially training as a zoologist and marine biologist at the University of Edinburgh and the University of California (Santa Cruz), I have spent the last 20 years of my life in search of answers to one extremely complex challenge: How can we create a more sustainable human presence on Earth?

“I still remember the day, in spring 1994, when I realized that the most effective way I could contribute to future generations being able to experience the bliss of swimming with a pod of dolphins in their natural habitat was not by continuing on my path towards becoming a marine mammal biologist, but by working in whatever small way I could to help my own species change its perspective and way of relating to life as a planetary process. We are participants in that process and our future depends on it.

“I dedicated the past two decades to investigating and learning how to apply ‘sustainable solutions’. In the process I spent time as an academic, grassroots activist, business consultant and educator, and worked with public authorities at the local, national and international (United Nations) level. I investigated, advocated and helped to implement sustainable solutions in many areas of human activity like transport, housing, community development, food production, water treatment, sustainable production and consumption, and education.

“Luckily everyday there are more sustainable solutions available to us, but applied at an inadequate scale or without paying attention to their systemic context, today’s solutions can quickly turn into tomorrow’s problems. Without the cultural ability to see our actions and the changes around us from a systemic perspective, combined with the wisdom to evaluate any proposed solutions in the context of their effects on the health and resilience of life as a whole, even well-meant attempts to create sustainability can have ill-fated results.

“Einstein’s widely quoted advice that “we cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them” seems more appropriate than ever. We are dealing with the complexity of a profound societal change and the transition towards diverse regenerative cultures as manifestations of not only a different way of being in the world, but also a different way of seeing the world.

“In a letter to Jan Christiaan Smuts, Einstein congratulated him for publishing Holism and Evolution (1926) and suggested that two concepts would shape human thinking in the next millennium, his own concept of ‘relativity’ and Smuts’s ‘holism’ defined as “the tendency in nature to form wholes that are greater than the sum of the parts through creative evolution” (Smuts, 1927).

“Holistic thinking is the new way of thinking needed to (dis)solve the problems created by reductionist thinking. But we should not over-swing the pendulum and favour holistic thinking in all circumstances over reductionist thinking. We should regard reductionism as a useful method to be applied if and when appropriate and within a whole-systems context that acknowledges the valuable contributions of diverse perspectives, as well as the limits to our knowing. We might prefer definitive answers and solutions, but what if they simply cannot be given?

“Are we chasing a mirage of certainty in a profoundly ambiguous and unpredictable world?…

… “In spring 2002 I had the good fortune to meet the physicist Fritjof Capra at Schumacher College. Capra clearly articulated something that I had intuitively known and was trying to understand better. He suggested that the ecological, environmental, social and economic crises we are facing are not separate but interconnected expressions of one single crisis: a crisis of perception. He explained how our culturally dominant worldview is informed by outdated scientific theories and a tendency to lose ourselves in the details of the perspective of a single discipline, rather than to see the ‘hidden connections’ that maintain the long-term viability of life as a whole.

The neo-Darwinist story of individuals and species in fierce competition for limited resources is an inadequate and limited conception of life. Nature sustains life by creating and nurturing communities. In today’s leading life sciences, evolution is no longer seen as a struggle for existence but as a collaborative dance and exploration of novelty. Capra pointed out that “sustainability is a dynamic process of co-evolution rather than a static state. Sustainability is a property of an entire web of relationships” (personal comment) rather than a characteristic of a single individual, company, country or species.

“The understanding that the common root cause of the multiple crises we are facing is in fact a crisis of perception offers us hope that we will be able to respond before it is too late. It suggests that if we were to employ a different way of thinking to the one that got us into this mess in the first place, we might realize how many interconnected problems can be combined in ways that point us towards a series of interconnected opportunities and systemic win-win-win solutions by addressing root-causes rather than symptoms.

Taking a systems view of life is an important step towards addressing the crisis of perception. Realizing our intimate kinship and communion with the process of life as a whole will trigger a shift in consciousness that will enable us to radically improve the quality of our lives and the health of the ecosystems and planet we inhabit. It will change the ways we relate to each other and the rest of the natural world and allow for the emergence of health as a systemic property linking human and planetary health.”

Blessings - Temple Illuminatusfelixwhywaitcrazywisdom

 

 

Russell Brand guest post

November 29, 2017

This comedian–essayist is like Marmite. You either love him or hate him.   But when I actually read his words, (which is my preferred method of absorbing knowledge),  I find myself in quite a bit of alignment with his perspective. This is despite my never being a celebrity, a Londoner, a drug addict, a non-voter, or over six foot tall.

‘No, Brand has long since transcended mere comedy. As we noted on June 8, 2015, he’s been more comfortable the last few years “posturing as a crusading champion of the downtrodden and a heroic enemy of The System.” His 2014 stand-up show was entitled Messiah Complex, for which this world-class egomaniac should at least get credit for truth in advertising.’

The following are excerpts from an article in the New Statesman from 2013,  plus  bits from his most recent podcasts;

http://www.radiox.co.uk/radio/podcasts/russell-brand/watch-russell-brand-team-energy-magic-from-druid/

I tried also to link to some interviews from 2017.   He’s also got a Youtube channel naturally.   The Trews, it’s called .    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5BY9veyhGt46KMmgAJYi1LF0EUkpqcrX

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For me the solution has to be primarily spiritual and secondarily political. This, too, is difficult terrain when the natural tribal leaders of the left are atheists, when Marxism is inveterately Godless. When the lumbering monotheistic faiths have given us millennia of grief for a handful of prayers and some sparkly rituals.

By spiritual I mean the acknowledgement that our connection to one another and the planet must be prioritised. Buckminster Fuller outlines what ought be our collective objectives succinctly: “to make the world work for 100 per cent of humanity in the shortest possible time through spontaneous co-operation without ecological offence or the disadvantage of anyone”. This maxim is the very essence of “easier said than done” as it implies the dismantling of our entire socio-economic machinery. By teatime.

“Throughout paganism one finds stories that integrate our species with our environment to the benefit of both. The function and benefits of these belief matrixes have been lost, with good reason. They were socialist, egalitarian and integrated. If like the Celtic people we revered the rivers we would prioritise this sacred knowledge and curtail the attempts of any that sought to pollute the rivers. If like the Nordic people we believed the souls of our ancestors lived in the trees, this connection would make mass deforestation anathema. If like the native people of America we believed God was in the soil what would our intuitive response be to the implementation of fracking?” Russell Brand

OBOD’s ArchDruid, Philip Carr-Gomm, spoke for one of Russell’s podcasts recently.

http://www.radiox.co.uk/radio/podcasts/russell-brand/watch-russell-brand-team-energy-magic-from-druid/

http://www.philipcarr-gomm.com/a-conversation-with-russell-brand/

The fellow is articulate and manic.

When people talk about politics within the existing Westminster framework I feel a dull thud in my stomach and my eyes involuntarily glaze. Like when I’m conversing and the subject changes from me and moves on to another topic. I try to remain engaged but behind my eyes I am adrift in immediate nostalgia; “How happy I was earlier in this chat,” I instantly think. …

The system is adept at turning our aggression on to one another. We condemn the rioters. The EDL condemns immigrants. My new rule for when I fancy doing a bit of the ol’ condemnation is: “Do the people I’m condemning have any actual power?”

We British seem to be a bit embarrassed about revolution, like the passion is uncouth or that some tea might get spilled on our cuffs in the uprising. That revolution is a bit French or worse still American. Well, the alternative is extinction so now might be a good time to re-evaluate. The apathy is in fact a transmission problem, when we are given the correct information in an engaging fashion, we will stir. …

Capitalism is not real; it is an idea. America is not real; it is an idea that someone had ages ago. Britain, Christianity, Islam, karate, Wednesdays are all just ideas that we choose to believe in and very nice ideas they are, too, when they serve a purpose. These concepts, though, cannot be served to the detriment of actual reality.

The reality is we have a spherical ecosystem, suspended in, as far as we know, infinite space upon which there are billions of carbon-based life forms, of which we presume ourselves to be the most important, and a limited amount of resources.

The only systems we can afford to employ are those that rationally serve the planet first, then all humanity. Not out of some woolly, bullshit tree-hugging piffle but because we live on it, currently without alternatives. This is why I believe we need a unifying and in clusive spiritual ideology: atheism and materialism atomise us and anchor us to one frequency of consciousness and inhibit necessary co-operation.”

“Eventually when thinking abates, I recognise that there is more to me than my thoughts. Stripped of biographical data there’s a form of consciousness that’s quite beautiful and serene and anybody can have access to it. I think that’s the point of a lot of religion, to get you to that place. And to create moral and ethical conditions where it’s likely that more people live like that. To not live according to biochemical drives and the social systems derived from those drives – greed-based, desire-based, fear-based systems.
“The point of recovery is to get back on the intended journey. What would you have been without the wound? Who were you before the trauma, without the shame, without the drugs or the bad relationships or the stupid, dumb belief systems that have been downloaded into your ‘ead?’
Read more at: https://www.scotsman.com/news/interview-russell-brand-1-4621833
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The Ritual of the Crane Dance Curse in Irish Mythology -from https://aliisaacstoryteller.com

September 24, 2017

  As Matriarch of the Order of Lugh I repost the words of my chief deity spoken in Eire 

A frenzy of battle invites you to embrace death.
Our hosting in this conflict will defeat the foreigners who have destroyed the prosperity of the land.
Oh people of the Sídhe, defenders of the land, ravens will come upon our enemies with doom!
May the foreigners be hindered, may fear be heard among them and be their shared torment!
They are sad and doomed.
Ninefold brightness is upon us!
Victory or defeat!
Faugh! Sod of Death!
Death Measure! Rod of Aspen!
Circling leftward I curse them!
Oh you my glorious ones!
The gods will sustain you from the clouds of the sky, in the beauty of the land, and through the powerful skills of Druids.
My battle fire will not falter until the victory is won!
What I ask of you is not the work of cowards, in the dealing of death to the enemy, in the burning fields of battle.
The shadow of death has taken form.
Death goes before us to the foe.
Before the people of the Sídhe,
Before Ogma I swear!
Before the sky and the land and the sea, I swear!
Before the Sun and the Moon and the stars, I swear!
Oh warrior band, my host of battle,
My troops here, the greatest of hosts like the sea,
Mighty waves of golden, powerful, boiling fires, and battle lust
Are created in each of you!
May you seek out your foe upon the field,
Embracing death in a frenzy of battle!

Source: The Ritual of the Crane Dance Curse in Irish Mythology

 

Note:  The traditional means of administering this curse is out loud, in a group, hopping on one leg and with one eye shut, in a circle.

Spiritual Stasis and the Void of Becoming — Philip Carr-Gomm guest post

September 4, 2017

Here we are, in the ‘dog days’ between the great North American Eclipse and the Neptunian Pisces full moon,  between the first and second harvest festivals,  waiting for Mercury to go direct and ripen our future.  Some of us feel like giving up, or as if we have lost direction.   OBOD ArchDruid Philip Carr-Gomm thinks that it may be time for the patience of stones.  Considered as the evidence of time itself, their formation can fill us with the ability to stop trying to ‘push the river’.

Take time to be still.  Growing goes at its own pace, likewise healing.   The wheel turns.

 

excerpt:

I have come to believe that on those occasion when the spark has deserted us – despite shaking a fist or two at the gods and bemoaning the fact that our inner compass feels out of whack – this fallow place is the most fertile of voids; our old self – whether we know it or not – is redundant and gradually dissolving. Any forward movement, no matter how desperately we desire it, will not happen until our new and more authentic shape is fully formed and ready to break out of the fragile boundary of our old being. This all happens in a subtle way beneath our surface; we become like winter soil, still, dark, resting but full of potential.

 

http://www.philipcarr-gomm.com/spiritual-stasis-and-the-void-of-becoming/

 

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