Posts Tagged ‘environment’

White Rabbit Grove statement on state air quality for 2019

May 17, 2018
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources 2019 Air Monitoring Network Plan – Proposed
 
healing line <helgaleenas@yahoo.com>
To:Katie.Praedel@wisconsin.gov,Sen. Miller,Rep. Anderson
May 17 at 11:37 AM

Please consider this my public comment upon this Air Quality Monitoring Plan for 2019.

https://dnr.wi.gov/topic/AirQuality/documents/2019NetworkPlanProposed.pdf

First I would like to congratulate the state DNR for updating to the higher particulate monitoring standard.  also it seems that urban pollution is actually decreasing overall.  However,  This 2019 plan has significant lapses.

THERE IS NO HYDROCARBON or HALIDE monitoring, although these substances have a significant effect on human health.  Recently a refinery with permit violations exploded in Superior WI causing a city-wide evacuation.  I hope that emergency air quality monitoring of some sort will be done, but at the public meeting there was no reassurance to be had for a Dane County resident (Marshall, site of a petroleum pipeline) whose health is significantly impacted by auto-immune responses to the petroleum based in the local air.

Supposedly due to budget constraints, the state does not monitor INDUSTRIAL sites; rather as part of permitting they are promising to monitor themselves.  But the data collected from this monitoring IS NOT AVAILABLE to the public, and DNR does not have its OWN MONITORS near these sites, as it is considered a redundancy.  The foxes are in charge of the hens when it comes to industry compliance.

Another controversial source of pollutants for 2019 may be the FOXCONN development in the southeast lakeshore area.  The water used by this international corporation has already been promised, from a neighboring watershed instead of the Great Lakes, which is going to be a tragedy for those inland from the site.  The DNR 2019 proposal does NOT contain any additional monitoring for this area, besides the existing ozone and near-highway programs.  Paper-milling areas are presently monitored for heavy metals, esp. mercury but the FOXCONN development area is not getting any. I suppose the present DNR would consider this monitoring ‘redundant,’ once again leaving an overseas ‘fox’ in charge of the air for us citizen ‘chickens.’

The problem is said to be a dearth of funds available. That is why I am sending this comment also to my elected representatives from Monona, WI district.  I would very much like for the industrial permitting process provisions for ‘self-monitoring ‘ to include state compliance monitoring costs.  These monitoring stations need to be under STATE control, not the industry itself.

Additionally, the petrochemical industry is currently getting too much support nationally and the only hope for the folks on the ground rests with state regulations.  Superior, Wisconsin tragedy, and the ongoing resistance to pipelines through our state is a wake-up call that monitoring of all effluents from petrochemicals need to be identified and regulated, as human health is already being compromised.

Thank you for your kind attention to this.

Helgaleena,

AD White Rabbit Grove RDNA
box 6121 Monona WI 53716
          My Grove is a very small place on a hilltop, surrounded by the dwellings of other humans, but we do see quite a lot of wildlife despite that.  It gives a feeling of accomplishment to raise my voice for all beings of the Grove, who otherwise would not be taken into account by the skimpy scientific monitoring of our health.
I encourage other humans to do the same for the places where you dwell.
Runoff from a boney dump
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Spending a year with Dame Judi Dench’s trees

March 22, 2018

Judi Dench: My Passion For Trees Full Program

They begin at winter, the traditional Druid year’s beginning.   It’s excellent.

Groves are communities indeed,  even scientifically.  On World Water Day, blessings from my grove to yours.

the-wind-garden-hero

A biologist trying to decode tree communication: Quartz re-post

February 18, 2018

https://qz.com/1116991/a-biologist-believes-that-trees-speak-a-language-we-can-learn/the-wind-garden-hero

see also:

https://undark.org/article/listening-to-the-thoughts-of-the-forest/

Listening to the Thoughts of the Forest ; Undark guest repost

February 8, 2018

https://undark.org/article/listening-to-the-thoughts-of-the-forest/

Listening to the Thoughts of the Forest

The fate of a Tennessee forest was weighed in a boardroom by an assembly of businessmen, lawyers, and scientists. They never listened to the trees.

 

excerpt:

“The meeting yielded a memorandum of understanding and a press release. The corporation agreed to stop converting native forests to plantations. In print, all parties congratulated one another. The governor added a supportive statement. By the standards of a technocratic world, this was a success, albeit one whose effects were mitigated over the following decade by fluctuations in newsprint pulp prices, mill closings, corporate mergers, and divestment of land. Now, a dozen years after this 2005 agreement, pressure to convert forests to plantations continues in the southeastern U.S. The chasm between the people in the room persists, as does our collective deafness to the forest.

“It is perhaps absurd to suggest that lawyers, scientists, lobbyists, and MBAs spend more of their time listening to trees, smelling the leaf litter, visiting paper mills, and talking to one another in the woods and the logging yards. In a data-driven world, one governed by quantifiable financial and scientific information, a practice of open-ended listening and bodily engagement seems out of place, a diversion or an irrelevance. But financial and scientific data are abstractions. The forest is not made of abstractions. It is not even made of separate, interacting objects. The forest is instead made of relationship. To enter this gargantuan conversation is to connect our bodies and brains to creatures and processes beyond ourselves. This is ecological “big data” wired directly into human cellular and cultural networks.

“It is time, then, for some unconventional in-service training: immersion in the forest’s mind. No polished shoes under tables, no soil-covering marble slabs, no slides of graphs delivered like slap shots at a goal. Instead, let us become sommeliers of forest soils (smell the varied overtones of ascomycete), tree-listeners (what crackle of drought do we hear in twigs, what rustle of unmade paper in the pine?), and interlocutors of root tips, bird memories, and human experience. We do so not to unearth ourselves into mysticism or to run away from disagreements in boardrooms. Rather, listening in the woods is a radical — radix, from the root — form of empiricism.”

Climate Repair Meditation — guest post from Green Mountain Druid Order

February 3, 2018

source:

http://www.philipcarr-gomm.com/climate-repair-meditation/

there is a live video at the link, and more.

Hello folks!

I am here today with the trees to share with you a simple and powerful practice for repairing the climate.

First I want to share a bit about how this came about.

Like so many of us, I have felt so much concern about climate change, and sadness about the loss of life, home, and habitat. It is painful to witness and devastating to experience.

Scientists are predicting massive environmental catastrophe and the changes are happening even faster than expected. These are scary times indeed, but I do believe there is hope!

What I know is that the mindset that created this problem is not the one that will get us out. It’s time we move beyond the box of the rational, the reductionist, the political.

What is beyond the box? Imagination, partnership, intention, love and MAGIC!

You see, Nature is always working to return to dynamic equilibrium. We have thrown things off so far, that she has had to conjure up powerful storms, fires, earthquakes to wake us up, to clear away the outmoded, and to bring us back into right relationship.
Right now right relationship must include taking responsibility and action to heal what has been damaged.

I am one of those wyrd people who talks to trees and stones, faery and dragon..
I go to Nature for answers to the big questions. So I went with the quandry of climate change and was given this practice by Sycamore Tree.

We know that the trees and all in the green world are Natures climate guardians. They gobble up CO2 and expel 02, creating the perfect balance of gasses for life as we know it.

But the trees can’t keep up. We have cut down too many forests and we have released too much CO2 into the atmosphere.

This practice is a way of expanding the natural capacity of the trees to do what they do, by partnering. Together we can change everything!

All you will need is just a few minutes of quiet time. This can be done sitting, standing, inside or out. Eyes closed or open.

This is designed to be done by people of all ages and denominations.

Please share and repeat!

May there be Peace throughout the whole world,
/|\ Fearn Lickfield

 

 

 

A Path of your Own –guest repost

January 21, 2018

http://www.philipcarr-gomm.com/a-path-of-your-own/

This counts as yet another individualized modern Druid way.  It is what Vern Crawford calls Tefistry.  He’s written a book about it. It’s the correct price, for truths– free.

 

https://tefistry.com/tefistry/

Example of cleared land around active well

 

 

January 2018: Two Full Moons: Super Full Moon and The Total Lunar Eclipse Blue Moon

January 7, 2018

Bard Mel Brake has really summed up the moons of January.

He also enlightened me that the hit song ‘Age of Aquarius’ is aligning today Jan. 7 2018, as it has not since 1998 🙂

 

melbrake

During this week Winter Solstice December 21, 2017, I was presented with a vision that featured one of my departed love ones who showed me a picture of him cutting me out of his life. On the other side of the room was a portal as one does open during the Winter Solstice but I was afraid of passing through it for fear of losing him.

Now when I think of this and the irony of me not wanting to pass through the portal because my loved one has been dead for more than 15 years but maybe, the message was not to be afraid to accept the changes that are here and now and to surrender to what no longer services us before we move into the new year of 2018.

Cutting ties to places, people and things that no longer services us.

Speaking of the year 2018 which…

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From the ‘crisis of perception’ to the ‘systems view of life’: Guest post on sustainable thinking

December 3, 2017

https://medium.com/age-of-awareness/from-the-crisis-of-perception-to-the-systems-view-of-life-df6973a754a3   by  Daniel Christian Wahl

excerpt:

“After initially training as a zoologist and marine biologist at the University of Edinburgh and the University of California (Santa Cruz), I have spent the last 20 years of my life in search of answers to one extremely complex challenge: How can we create a more sustainable human presence on Earth?

“I still remember the day, in spring 1994, when I realized that the most effective way I could contribute to future generations being able to experience the bliss of swimming with a pod of dolphins in their natural habitat was not by continuing on my path towards becoming a marine mammal biologist, but by working in whatever small way I could to help my own species change its perspective and way of relating to life as a planetary process. We are participants in that process and our future depends on it.

“I dedicated the past two decades to investigating and learning how to apply ‘sustainable solutions’. In the process I spent time as an academic, grassroots activist, business consultant and educator, and worked with public authorities at the local, national and international (United Nations) level. I investigated, advocated and helped to implement sustainable solutions in many areas of human activity like transport, housing, community development, food production, water treatment, sustainable production and consumption, and education.

“Luckily everyday there are more sustainable solutions available to us, but applied at an inadequate scale or without paying attention to their systemic context, today’s solutions can quickly turn into tomorrow’s problems. Without the cultural ability to see our actions and the changes around us from a systemic perspective, combined with the wisdom to evaluate any proposed solutions in the context of their effects on the health and resilience of life as a whole, even well-meant attempts to create sustainability can have ill-fated results.

“Einstein’s widely quoted advice that “we cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them” seems more appropriate than ever. We are dealing with the complexity of a profound societal change and the transition towards diverse regenerative cultures as manifestations of not only a different way of being in the world, but also a different way of seeing the world.

“In a letter to Jan Christiaan Smuts, Einstein congratulated him for publishing Holism and Evolution (1926) and suggested that two concepts would shape human thinking in the next millennium, his own concept of ‘relativity’ and Smuts’s ‘holism’ defined as “the tendency in nature to form wholes that are greater than the sum of the parts through creative evolution” (Smuts, 1927).

“Holistic thinking is the new way of thinking needed to (dis)solve the problems created by reductionist thinking. But we should not over-swing the pendulum and favour holistic thinking in all circumstances over reductionist thinking. We should regard reductionism as a useful method to be applied if and when appropriate and within a whole-systems context that acknowledges the valuable contributions of diverse perspectives, as well as the limits to our knowing. We might prefer definitive answers and solutions, but what if they simply cannot be given?

“Are we chasing a mirage of certainty in a profoundly ambiguous and unpredictable world?…

… “In spring 2002 I had the good fortune to meet the physicist Fritjof Capra at Schumacher College. Capra clearly articulated something that I had intuitively known and was trying to understand better. He suggested that the ecological, environmental, social and economic crises we are facing are not separate but interconnected expressions of one single crisis: a crisis of perception. He explained how our culturally dominant worldview is informed by outdated scientific theories and a tendency to lose ourselves in the details of the perspective of a single discipline, rather than to see the ‘hidden connections’ that maintain the long-term viability of life as a whole.

The neo-Darwinist story of individuals and species in fierce competition for limited resources is an inadequate and limited conception of life. Nature sustains life by creating and nurturing communities. In today’s leading life sciences, evolution is no longer seen as a struggle for existence but as a collaborative dance and exploration of novelty. Capra pointed out that “sustainability is a dynamic process of co-evolution rather than a static state. Sustainability is a property of an entire web of relationships” (personal comment) rather than a characteristic of a single individual, company, country or species.

“The understanding that the common root cause of the multiple crises we are facing is in fact a crisis of perception offers us hope that we will be able to respond before it is too late. It suggests that if we were to employ a different way of thinking to the one that got us into this mess in the first place, we might realize how many interconnected problems can be combined in ways that point us towards a series of interconnected opportunities and systemic win-win-win solutions by addressing root-causes rather than symptoms.

Taking a systems view of life is an important step towards addressing the crisis of perception. Realizing our intimate kinship and communion with the process of life as a whole will trigger a shift in consciousness that will enable us to radically improve the quality of our lives and the health of the ecosystems and planet we inhabit. It will change the ways we relate to each other and the rest of the natural world and allow for the emergence of health as a systemic property linking human and planetary health.”

Blessings - Temple Illuminatusfelixwhywaitcrazywisdom

 

 

Spiritual Stasis and the Void of Becoming — Philip Carr-Gomm guest post

September 4, 2017

Here we are, in the ‘dog days’ between the great North American Eclipse and the Neptunian Pisces full moon,  between the first and second harvest festivals,  waiting for Mercury to go direct and ripen our future.  Some of us feel like giving up, or as if we have lost direction.   OBOD ArchDruid Philip Carr-Gomm thinks that it may be time for the patience of stones.  Considered as the evidence of time itself, their formation can fill us with the ability to stop trying to ‘push the river’.

Take time to be still.  Growing goes at its own pace, likewise healing.   The wheel turns.

 

excerpt:

I have come to believe that on those occasion when the spark has deserted us – despite shaking a fist or two at the gods and bemoaning the fact that our inner compass feels out of whack – this fallow place is the most fertile of voids; our old self – whether we know it or not – is redundant and gradually dissolving. Any forward movement, no matter how desperately we desire it, will not happen until our new and more authentic shape is fully formed and ready to break out of the fragile boundary of our old being. This all happens in a subtle way beneath our surface; we become like winter soil, still, dark, resting but full of potential.

 

http://www.philipcarr-gomm.com/spiritual-stasis-and-the-void-of-becoming/

 

whitephantomquartz-2

The Sápara Nation vs. the Slimy Oil Mungia guest re-post

August 14, 2017

The Sapara Nation versus the Slimy Oil Mungia –re-postmanari-ushigua