Posts Tagged ‘environment’

From the ‘crisis of perception’ to the ‘systems view of life’: Guest post on sustainable thinking

December 3, 2017

https://medium.com/age-of-awareness/from-the-crisis-of-perception-to-the-systems-view-of-life-df6973a754a3   by  Daniel Christian Wahl

excerpt:

“After initially training as a zoologist and marine biologist at the University of Edinburgh and the University of California (Santa Cruz), I have spent the last 20 years of my life in search of answers to one extremely complex challenge: How can we create a more sustainable human presence on Earth?

“I still remember the day, in spring 1994, when I realized that the most effective way I could contribute to future generations being able to experience the bliss of swimming with a pod of dolphins in their natural habitat was not by continuing on my path towards becoming a marine mammal biologist, but by working in whatever small way I could to help my own species change its perspective and way of relating to life as a planetary process. We are participants in that process and our future depends on it.

“I dedicated the past two decades to investigating and learning how to apply ‘sustainable solutions’. In the process I spent time as an academic, grassroots activist, business consultant and educator, and worked with public authorities at the local, national and international (United Nations) level. I investigated, advocated and helped to implement sustainable solutions in many areas of human activity like transport, housing, community development, food production, water treatment, sustainable production and consumption, and education.

“Luckily everyday there are more sustainable solutions available to us, but applied at an inadequate scale or without paying attention to their systemic context, today’s solutions can quickly turn into tomorrow’s problems. Without the cultural ability to see our actions and the changes around us from a systemic perspective, combined with the wisdom to evaluate any proposed solutions in the context of their effects on the health and resilience of life as a whole, even well-meant attempts to create sustainability can have ill-fated results.

“Einstein’s widely quoted advice that “we cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them” seems more appropriate than ever. We are dealing with the complexity of a profound societal change and the transition towards diverse regenerative cultures as manifestations of not only a different way of being in the world, but also a different way of seeing the world.

“In a letter to Jan Christiaan Smuts, Einstein congratulated him for publishing Holism and Evolution (1926) and suggested that two concepts would shape human thinking in the next millennium, his own concept of ‘relativity’ and Smuts’s ‘holism’ defined as “the tendency in nature to form wholes that are greater than the sum of the parts through creative evolution” (Smuts, 1927).

“Holistic thinking is the new way of thinking needed to (dis)solve the problems created by reductionist thinking. But we should not over-swing the pendulum and favour holistic thinking in all circumstances over reductionist thinking. We should regard reductionism as a useful method to be applied if and when appropriate and within a whole-systems context that acknowledges the valuable contributions of diverse perspectives, as well as the limits to our knowing. We might prefer definitive answers and solutions, but what if they simply cannot be given?

“Are we chasing a mirage of certainty in a profoundly ambiguous and unpredictable world?…

… “In spring 2002 I had the good fortune to meet the physicist Fritjof Capra at Schumacher College. Capra clearly articulated something that I had intuitively known and was trying to understand better. He suggested that the ecological, environmental, social and economic crises we are facing are not separate but interconnected expressions of one single crisis: a crisis of perception. He explained how our culturally dominant worldview is informed by outdated scientific theories and a tendency to lose ourselves in the details of the perspective of a single discipline, rather than to see the ‘hidden connections’ that maintain the long-term viability of life as a whole.

The neo-Darwinist story of individuals and species in fierce competition for limited resources is an inadequate and limited conception of life. Nature sustains life by creating and nurturing communities. In today’s leading life sciences, evolution is no longer seen as a struggle for existence but as a collaborative dance and exploration of novelty. Capra pointed out that “sustainability is a dynamic process of co-evolution rather than a static state. Sustainability is a property of an entire web of relationships” (personal comment) rather than a characteristic of a single individual, company, country or species.

“The understanding that the common root cause of the multiple crises we are facing is in fact a crisis of perception offers us hope that we will be able to respond before it is too late. It suggests that if we were to employ a different way of thinking to the one that got us into this mess in the first place, we might realize how many interconnected problems can be combined in ways that point us towards a series of interconnected opportunities and systemic win-win-win solutions by addressing root-causes rather than symptoms.

Taking a systems view of life is an important step towards addressing the crisis of perception. Realizing our intimate kinship and communion with the process of life as a whole will trigger a shift in consciousness that will enable us to radically improve the quality of our lives and the health of the ecosystems and planet we inhabit. It will change the ways we relate to each other and the rest of the natural world and allow for the emergence of health as a systemic property linking human and planetary health.”

Blessings - Temple Illuminatusfelixwhywaitcrazywisdom

 

 

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Spiritual Stasis and the Void of Becoming — Philip Carr-Gomm guest post

September 4, 2017

Here we are, in the ‘dog days’ between the great North American Eclipse and the Neptunian Pisces full moon,  between the first and second harvest festivals,  waiting for Mercury to go direct and ripen our future.  Some of us feel like giving up, or as if we have lost direction.   OBOD ArchDruid Philip Carr-Gomm thinks that it may be time for the patience of stones.  Considered as the evidence of time itself, their formation can fill us with the ability to stop trying to ‘push the river’.

Take time to be still.  Growing goes at its own pace, likewise healing.   The wheel turns.

 

excerpt:

I have come to believe that on those occasion when the spark has deserted us – despite shaking a fist or two at the gods and bemoaning the fact that our inner compass feels out of whack – this fallow place is the most fertile of voids; our old self – whether we know it or not – is redundant and gradually dissolving. Any forward movement, no matter how desperately we desire it, will not happen until our new and more authentic shape is fully formed and ready to break out of the fragile boundary of our old being. This all happens in a subtle way beneath our surface; we become like winter soil, still, dark, resting but full of potential.

 

http://www.philipcarr-gomm.com/spiritual-stasis-and-the-void-of-becoming/

 

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The Sápara Nation vs. the Slimy Oil Mungia guest re-post

August 14, 2017

The Sapara Nation versus the Slimy Oil Mungia –re-postmanari-ushigua

Guest Post: Kevin Tucker

April 12, 2017

 

 

 

 

art by Frida Kahlo

It’s Going Down Column “Peak Civ” first part

“Civilizations are artificial cultural constructions, not biological organisms, and they would be poor biological performers if we insisted on considering them as organisms.”
– John Bodley, The Power of Scale

Our lineage, as nomadic hunter-gatherers, still shapes the way we see, interact and understand the world. That is a lineage shaped by millions of years of egalitarian, anarchistic existence. That is a lineage that defines each of us, but is perpetually being torn apart, repackaged and sold to us through the domestication process…

If we want to understand power, if we want to understand where and how inequality arises, then we need to stop granting the illusions of the power-hungry. The State exists because it has bent carrying capacity, prolonged itself (albeit temporarily) through agriculture and technological intrusions. The State had to create the concept of nature as a separate place so that it could have us believe that civilization had conquered it….

You should be afraid of what Trump can do, but you can’t separate him from the society that created him. One where the liberals and NGOs were so committed that they would lull themselves to sleep at night thinking symbolic compromise was enough. What we face with climate change is potentially endemic for both humanity and the world. How we fight it cannot be through politics. They will simply never be enough.

Kevin Tucker

It’s Going Down

 

 

Ostara ;Vernal equinox (northern hemisphere)

March 19, 2017

Celebrate the March Equinox with the Arrival of the Zodiacal Light on Slooha8b33469-0372-43bc-86a4-57df663d0268

Eoster and Bunny

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Solstice story by moi– #freeread Happy holiday!

December 21, 2016

Solstice of the Whirled

by Helgaleena
originally published in
A Dark Roasted Christmas Volume 2
(out of print) http://www.123rf.com/photo_15076466_infinity-spiral-from-autumn-photos-travel-and-seasons-concept.html
As it is midsummer at one end of the vajra and the longest night at the other end, I dreamed that they were in love.

Earth First! UK Zine Wants Your Writing!

October 3, 2016

http://earthfirstjournal.org/newswire/2016/10/03/earth-first-uk-zine-wants-your-writing/

earth-first-vol-1

‘For a semi-regular zine of activist reflections and actions.

‘This is an invitation for articles offering a critical analysis and reflections on Earth First! and related environmental and social justice direct action movements, how we organise and the actions we take. Contributions can be about actions in the UK or international. We also welcome book reviews, activist resources, short rants, illustrations, cartoons, poems and photographs. We suggest 500 – 2000 words for articles…’

If you feel a calling to share your stories of earthly interactions,  go to the link above to read more.

Guest post–The Archdruid Report: Déjà Vu All Over Again

January 6, 2015

The Archdruid Report: Déjà Vu All Over Again.
excerpt:
‘Now that the downturn in oil prices is under way, and panic selling of energy-related junk bonds and lower grades of unconventional crude oil has begun in earnest, it seems likely that we’ll learn just how profitable the fracking fad of the last few years actually was. My working guess, which is admittedly an outsider’s view based on limited data and historical parallels, is that it was a money-losing operation from the beginning, and looked prosperous—as the Oklahoma boom did—only because it attracted a flood of investment money from people and institutions who were swept up in the craze. If I’m right, the spike in domestic US oil production due to fracking was never more than an artifact of fiscal irresponsibility in the first place, and could not have been sustained no matter what.’

Fossil fuels are not sustainable. Says moi.