Posts Tagged ‘wisdom’

Truth and Stories

June 6, 2018

flame

There is an expression for communicating among humans– ‘breaking news’.   It refers to very fresh, not old, information that is sufficiently significant that the old reality, the older news, will be changed by it.  Like a newborn emerging from its eggshell it presents a fresh perspective upon our shared world.

Often our view of the world is a bit stale and habitual. Habits are a source of comfort , as old friends.  However, since things constantly change with the passage of time, it may be necessary to freshen up our grasp of reality, of truth itself, if our position isn’t comfy anymore, if our rear ends sag too near the road upon the life path.

What do you take as a ‘given’ that might not be so?  Is there anything that simply won’t ‘come true’ no matter how hard you believe it?  Have you begun to no longer trust your own thoughts, your own feelings, maybe your own senses?  Danger, danger!  No matter how the New Agers sell the power of ‘manifesting your perfect life’.  it has to be do-able here upon the Earth-Mother. 

It may be time to still yourself, ground yourself, reconnect with your own heart and soul, where in truth we are already part of perfection.  Make certain that the news you pass along is truth.

There is also a Druid slogan, ‘Truth against the world.’  That truth is known as Awen,  insight into the eternal and immutable.  All things that manifest can only do so to the extent that they are part of that Truth.  Check it against inner Awen, if you have come across it out in the World.

 

Salman Rushdie has written things that ring true, even presented as fiction, enough to perturb many people whose perspectives are a bit rigid.  He wrote recently about the dilemma of #fakenews  that can get its readers or listeners confused about how our world actually is.  Those who shout loudest that something is #fakenews may actually want us to instead stop thinking and trust the brand of expertise or authority they are touting at the moment.

 

“I have argued, for much of my life as a writer, that the breakdown in the old agreements about reality is now the most significant reality, and that the world can perhaps best be explained in terms of conflicting and often incompatible narratives. In Kashmir and in the Middle East, and in the battle between progressive America and Trumpistan, we see examples of such incompatibilities. I have also maintained that the consequences of this new, argumentative, even polemical attitude to the real has profound implications for literature—that we can’t, or ought not to, pretend it isn’t there. I believe that the influence on public discourse of more, and more varied, voices has been a good thing, enriching our literatures and making more complex our understanding of the world.

“And yet I now face, as we all do, a genuine conundrum. How can we argue, on the one hand, that modern reality has become necessarily multidimensional, fractured and fragmented, and, on the other hand, that reality is a very particular thing, an unarguable series of things that are so, which needs to be defended against the attacks of, to be frank, the things that are not so, which are being promulgated by, let’s say, the Modi Administration in India, the Brexit crew in the U.K., and the President of the United States? How to combat the worst aspects of the Internet, that parallel universe in which important information and total garbage coexist, side by side, with, apparently, the same levels of authority, making it harder than ever for people to tell them apart? How to resist the erosion in the public acceptance of “basic facts,” scientific facts, evidence-supported facts about, say, climate change or inoculations for children? How to combat the political demagoguery that seeks to do what authoritarians have always wanted—to undermine the public’s belief in evidence, and to say to their electorates, in effect, “Believe nothing except me, for I am the truth”? What do we do about that? And what, specifically, might be the role of art, and the role of the literary arts in particular?”

Salman Rushdie

We tell a story of ourselves by the very act of living our lives each day.  Nimue Brown has written about that recently, too.  Because we live with other humans, and in fact need to do it that way,  there is always a balancing act between their realities and ours.  Sometimes, they conflict badly enough that one story will try to over-write another.  Danger, Danger again!  How much of your own truth are you willing to amend just to keep the peace?

“People will fight and kill to protect their stories and their take on reality, even when those stories are clearly harming them. As the person breaking the story, you are perhaps more likely to be seen as the destructive oppressor, and not the rescuing angel you may imagine yourself to be. Those still in the story may simply recast you so that they can keep the story going. “You used to be such a nice little girl. I don’t know what went wrong.”

“Sometimes, the only way out of a story is to break away from the people whose story it is. Sometimes, the only option is to play the role consciously and then escape into spaces where you can properly be yourself. Sometimes to do that, a safe house is required, a new identity, police protection. Sometimes you have to ask difficult questions about the price of your relationships, and the implications of leaving them. People can die as a consequence of misjudging this.

“If you call out a story as a lie, even if you can evidence it, people may fight you. They may fire you, take you to court, lie about you, attack you on social media. They may deprive you of key resources. If you refuse to play your allotted role you may be harassed, ridiculed, threatened or abandoned. You have no control over how other people respond when you stop acting in line with their story.

“But you have the right to live your own life, and you have the right to be safe. So, if you’re wrecking a story, plan your escape routes first – more or less literally as required. Do some risk assessment. Consider the consequences. Try to break the story as calmly as you can, with minimal drama. There is nothing like drama to keep a story moving, because even as you think you’re resisting it, you can find the energy of it being sucked in and used to reinforce the existing story. You were always a useless child. Now you’re upsetting everyone with this stupid idea that you can do something. It’s all your fault… These are the outcomes to avoid.

“It’s natural to want justice, to want recognition. It’s reasonable to want the people who have miscast you to realise their mistakes. It’s also very likely that you won’t get that. If you choose to stay and fight, you may be pulled back into the old story. Sometimes, it is better to go quietly and start a new story of your own somewhere else.”

Nimue Brown  

Sometimes another person is so afraid of your view that they insist upon calling you wrong, or a ‘bad guy’, even insisting that what you see with your own eyes, hear with your own ears, is not so.  Danger, Danger yet again.   If your own senses cannot be relied upon you are severely crippled for handling living. Best to stay true to them, and to yourself, and get far away from one who can only thwart you.  They are ‘gas-lighting’. If you remain with this person,  soon everything will be labeled as your fault.  It never helps to feel that way;  the person who constantly refuses to take responsibility for their own truth will try to get another to do it for them.

The world is our teacher.  Sometimes it is our culture that presents itself, other times we can go right to the Source, to Nature.  Nature has no bias.  No matter what direction a culture may sway us, Nature will not care.  The better a culture harmonizes with Nature, the more successful it proves.  But too often cultures are ossified and losing touch with Nature; they are the ones that are most concerned with the obedience of individuals.

It is one thing to observe and to learn, and another to be a mere follower who depends on the views of another.  If your world has become a prison of fears and prejudices,  it’s time for an open door policy and a good sweeping out.

The Third Reich built its powers by scapegoating minorities and poisoning the public opinion to allow for atrocities against ‘lesser’ populations. Secrecy shielded the worst of the genocide from ordinary citizens. Lies of omission were very common.

Truth is not meant to be hidden.  There is nothing to be ashamed of.  If you have anything in your story that you think you need to hide, please heal it.  If someone else in your world gives you shame for a thing,  do not accept that present.  Or if you find it has been delivered, put it in the compost.

“In Germany, after the Second World War, the authors of what was called Trümmerliteratur, or “rubble literature,” felt the need to rebuild their language, poisoned by Nazism, as well as their country, which lay in ruins. They understood that reality, truth, needed to be reconstructed from the ground up, with new language, just as the bombed cities needed to be rebuilt. I think we can learn from their example. We stand once again, though for different reasons, in the midst of the rubble of the truth. And it is for us—writers, thinkers, journalists, philosophers—to undertake the task of rebuilding our readers’ belief in reality, their faith in the truth. And to do it with new language, from the ground up.”

Salman Rushdie

If you find yourself unsure about a story which is not presented as fiction, but as truth,  be careful of it.  Even the people you trust can be fooled.  Try tossing it all against the wall and see what sticks.

adfsigil

peace, peace, peace

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Spending a year with Dame Judi Dench’s trees

March 22, 2018

Judi Dench: My Passion For Trees Full Program

They begin at winter, the traditional Druid year’s beginning.   It’s excellent.

Groves are communities indeed,  even scientifically.  On World Water Day, blessings from my grove to yours.

the-wind-garden-hero

Spring Cleaning yoga

March 1, 2018

This is a re-post from earlier in the Druid blog, which was inspired by finding the article below.   Be certain to follow the link to my original article, inset, as well as checking out the hints in Om Times.

 

 

The Key to Removing Unwanted Entities https://omtimes.com/2016/07/key-removing-unwanted-entities/

Helgaleena

Image

From Chakra Healing and Karmic Awareness by Keith Sherwood (2005 Llewellyn Publications, St. Paul Mn USA)  :

“Below you will find a series of commitments that will sever your links to non-physical beings outside your energy field… and will bring you in accord with the will of the Self as it emerges through your higher and lower mind. In addition, these commitments will safeguard your energy field from any further intrusions of non-physical beings by strengthening your boundaries on all worlds anbd dimensions, including the world of spirit, intellect, soul, lower mind, world of the chakras, and the levels of the splenic chakras.

If you know it’s appropriate to make these commitments and you know you will keep them permanently, then simply read the commitments below, repeat them out loud, and affirm, “I agree to these three commitments.”

The first is:

“If  I have given permission or inadvertently given…

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When you can choose to disbelieve By Nimue Brown –guest post

December 30, 2017

Most times when I re-post my fellow Druid author’s blogging, I give you only a taste of the whole here.  This time it’s the entire thing. She’s put it very succinctly and thoroughly.  The medicine for disbelief is TRUTH (awen).  The cure is to combine truth with BELIEF.  

BELIEVE  in the experiences of others.  Believe in your own true experience.  Believe in the future as it comes.  The future is woven not from disbelief but from belief.  Disbelief is a way of not facing what unfolds, and also disables our ability to deal with things.

When you can choose to disbelieve By Nimue Brown

There are a great many things that are subject to disbelief. Racial hatred, abuse and harassment, sexual hatred abuse and harassment, the practical and social difficulties grinding down the disabled, and the relentless misery of being poor. If I’m online any day, the odds are I’ll see someone questioning that these things happen, disbelieving victims and sufferers and offering alternative explanations.

The option to disbelieve comes from not being affected personally. So many people are so easily persuaded that if they haven’t seen it, it doesn’t happen. This means that when others try and tell them what happens, they ignore the evidence in favour of their belief, and so they still don’t see it happening.

Disbelief is most often followed by shaming and blaming. The feckless poor with their cigarettes and alcohol. The women who bring it upon themselves by having bodies and clothes and going outside. The disabled people who aren’t trying hard enough to magic themselves well. I think the worst of this is what comes up over race to try and explain away brutality, oppression and a rigged game designed to be unwinnable if you’re from the ‘wrong’ group. Often this is the worst of it because poverty is usually in there too, and the other things on the list can and do feature.

Disbelief means taking no responsibility. It means there’s no pressure to look either at your own behaviour or about the way you participate in a culture that allows this. Disbelief affirms the feeling that all your good things come from your hard work and virtue. You’re too clever to be raped, to get sick, to become poor. The illusion of safety and of being in control are comforting things.

Disbelief is also another form of misery to heap onto those already in trouble. Not only are you dealing with some vile thing, but you’re doing it surrounded by people who tell you it does not exist, is not happening, does not happen. You’ve made it up to get attention (because there’s so much glory, wealth and power to be obtained by admitting you were abused, right?). You’re lying. You’re trying to get out of something or get something for nothing or get special treatment. You’re a snowflake. You’re to blame. And when you’ve already been knocked down by something, dealing with people who refuse to believe it even exists is ghastly.

If people around you deny your reality, say your experience doesn’t exist or is your fault, that way lies madness. Being told you are the cause of the abuse you have suffered crushes your sense of self, takes away your self esteem, may make you question your own experience and your right to feel about it as you do. And of course if all you ever see is people denying that your problem is a real problem, you’ll be less likely to call it out in the first place.

If you’ve been there, it isn’t a belief issue. If you’ve seen it, you know it happens. You don’t have to question why someone would say something like that. You don’t try to figure out how it was their fault, because you know what happens. Disbelief is a luxury available only to those who do not know.

From the ‘crisis of perception’ to the ‘systems view of life’: Guest post on sustainable thinking

December 3, 2017

https://medium.com/age-of-awareness/from-the-crisis-of-perception-to-the-systems-view-of-life-df6973a754a3   by  Daniel Christian Wahl

excerpt:

“After initially training as a zoologist and marine biologist at the University of Edinburgh and the University of California (Santa Cruz), I have spent the last 20 years of my life in search of answers to one extremely complex challenge: How can we create a more sustainable human presence on Earth?

“I still remember the day, in spring 1994, when I realized that the most effective way I could contribute to future generations being able to experience the bliss of swimming with a pod of dolphins in their natural habitat was not by continuing on my path towards becoming a marine mammal biologist, but by working in whatever small way I could to help my own species change its perspective and way of relating to life as a planetary process. We are participants in that process and our future depends on it.

“I dedicated the past two decades to investigating and learning how to apply ‘sustainable solutions’. In the process I spent time as an academic, grassroots activist, business consultant and educator, and worked with public authorities at the local, national and international (United Nations) level. I investigated, advocated and helped to implement sustainable solutions in many areas of human activity like transport, housing, community development, food production, water treatment, sustainable production and consumption, and education.

“Luckily everyday there are more sustainable solutions available to us, but applied at an inadequate scale or without paying attention to their systemic context, today’s solutions can quickly turn into tomorrow’s problems. Without the cultural ability to see our actions and the changes around us from a systemic perspective, combined with the wisdom to evaluate any proposed solutions in the context of their effects on the health and resilience of life as a whole, even well-meant attempts to create sustainability can have ill-fated results.

“Einstein’s widely quoted advice that “we cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them” seems more appropriate than ever. We are dealing with the complexity of a profound societal change and the transition towards diverse regenerative cultures as manifestations of not only a different way of being in the world, but also a different way of seeing the world.

“In a letter to Jan Christiaan Smuts, Einstein congratulated him for publishing Holism and Evolution (1926) and suggested that two concepts would shape human thinking in the next millennium, his own concept of ‘relativity’ and Smuts’s ‘holism’ defined as “the tendency in nature to form wholes that are greater than the sum of the parts through creative evolution” (Smuts, 1927).

“Holistic thinking is the new way of thinking needed to (dis)solve the problems created by reductionist thinking. But we should not over-swing the pendulum and favour holistic thinking in all circumstances over reductionist thinking. We should regard reductionism as a useful method to be applied if and when appropriate and within a whole-systems context that acknowledges the valuable contributions of diverse perspectives, as well as the limits to our knowing. We might prefer definitive answers and solutions, but what if they simply cannot be given?

“Are we chasing a mirage of certainty in a profoundly ambiguous and unpredictable world?…

… “In spring 2002 I had the good fortune to meet the physicist Fritjof Capra at Schumacher College. Capra clearly articulated something that I had intuitively known and was trying to understand better. He suggested that the ecological, environmental, social and economic crises we are facing are not separate but interconnected expressions of one single crisis: a crisis of perception. He explained how our culturally dominant worldview is informed by outdated scientific theories and a tendency to lose ourselves in the details of the perspective of a single discipline, rather than to see the ‘hidden connections’ that maintain the long-term viability of life as a whole.

The neo-Darwinist story of individuals and species in fierce competition for limited resources is an inadequate and limited conception of life. Nature sustains life by creating and nurturing communities. In today’s leading life sciences, evolution is no longer seen as a struggle for existence but as a collaborative dance and exploration of novelty. Capra pointed out that “sustainability is a dynamic process of co-evolution rather than a static state. Sustainability is a property of an entire web of relationships” (personal comment) rather than a characteristic of a single individual, company, country or species.

“The understanding that the common root cause of the multiple crises we are facing is in fact a crisis of perception offers us hope that we will be able to respond before it is too late. It suggests that if we were to employ a different way of thinking to the one that got us into this mess in the first place, we might realize how many interconnected problems can be combined in ways that point us towards a series of interconnected opportunities and systemic win-win-win solutions by addressing root-causes rather than symptoms.

Taking a systems view of life is an important step towards addressing the crisis of perception. Realizing our intimate kinship and communion with the process of life as a whole will trigger a shift in consciousness that will enable us to radically improve the quality of our lives and the health of the ecosystems and planet we inhabit. It will change the ways we relate to each other and the rest of the natural world and allow for the emergence of health as a systemic property linking human and planetary health.”

Blessings - Temple Illuminatusfelixwhywaitcrazywisdom

 

 

Solstice story by moi– #freeread Happy holiday!

December 21, 2016

Solstice of the Whirled

by Helgaleena
originally published in
A Dark Roasted Christmas Volume 2
(out of print) http://www.123rf.com/photo_15076466_infinity-spiral-from-autumn-photos-travel-and-seasons-concept.html
As it is midsummer at one end of the vajra and the longest night at the other end, I dreamed that they were in love.

Leah Whitehorse guest post- New Moon in Scorpio 2016 : Ghosts

October 30, 2016

http://www.leahwhitehorse.com/2016/10/26/new-moon-in-scorpio-october-2016-ghosts/#comment-435351

The New Moon occurs at 17:28 (UT) on the 30th October 2016 at 07°Sc43′

After all the noise of the last Aries Full Moon, this lunation feels intensely quiet. The Moon and Sun conjoined in Scorpio brings conscious and unconscious together and in this moment of inner alignment, we’re plunged into the darkest reaches of the self. In these shadowy places are our greatest fears and passions. It’s the terror of death and sometimes the terror to really LIVE. Scorpio rules those kinds of endings that are absolutely final, the loss that we must grief for and accept. It rules that heady moment when there is only skin against skin and nothing in between you and your lover. There’s nothing insipid about Scorpio, what it feels, it feels down to the bone. It’s raw and unbridled and has a curious magnetic compulsion that draws us deeper…

This New Moon falls just before Samhain/Hallowe’en as well as All Souls and All Saint’s and the Mexican Day of the Dead. At this time of year, as the nights begin to draw in and the foliage withers and dies, Death comes knocking in the form of little kids dressed up in scary costumes and we carve pumpkins to shoo off ‘The Devil’. Horror films play on a loop and Mars square to Uranus in this chart is like the electric shock of surprise as the big bad leaps into view and you fall giggling in a heap, hair still standing on end. Death and fear are uniquely bound. It’s fear of the unknown that gets us but Scorpio knows that the path of the unknown is the one to take, especially as the Moon and Sun are sextile the North Node, pointing the way towards evolution.

Those of us who practice a spiritual tradition may visit the grave of loved ones or create ancestor altars to honour those who have passed. Asteroids Memoria and Photographica oppose this New Moon so going through old photographs and stirring memories may feel challenging but also offers great healing during this time.

This lunation is conjunct Mercury who in Roman mythology was a psychopomp, escorting the souls of the dead to the heavens. Mercury’s close proximity to this Moon means that maybe we’re talking or thinking about those who have passed – or talking with them. The Moon and Mercury are both trine to Neptune so this Moon is a spiritual communion between ourselves and the other worlds beyond. Whether the connection is to the deceased or to deities, angels or guides, the veil between the worlds is even thinner than normal at this time of year. Dreams now may be especially vivid and spirit contact too may come through the dream state. During this lunation, we’re called to listen to the space between the sounds, the whispers of the soul. Communication of all kinds lingers in the ether and if we are receptive, there’s much we can learn. Listen to your intuition.

The Moon is on the Sabian symbol :-

A Calm Lake Bathed In Moonlight

Make time for reflection. Not only is there the opportunity to connect with souls who once trod the Earth but other old ghosts may come calling from deep within the psyche. Don’t be afraid. These spectres of the past are part of your history. Send back healing to bygone years if necessary. There is nothing to control, nothing to fear. In life and death, all is well. Make peace with your ghosts.

mistypath1-e1448278855414

Our Ignorance: Ipsos MORI | Poll | Perceptions are not reality: Things the world gets wrong

November 13, 2014

Ipsos MORI | Poll | Perceptions are not reality: Things the world gets wrong.

http://www.alternet.org/story/148826/16_of_the_dumbest_things_americans_believe_–_and_the_right-wing_lies_behind_them