Posts Tagged ‘wisdom’

When you can choose to disbelieve By Nimue Brown –guest post

December 30, 2017

Most times when I re-post my fellow Druid author’s blogging, I give you only a taste of the whole here.  This time it’s the entire thing. She’s put it very succinctly and thoroughly.  The medicine for disbelief is TRUTH (awen).  The cure is to combine truth with BELIEF.  

BELIEVE  in the experiences of others.  Believe in your own true experience.  Believe in the future as it comes.  The future is woven not from disbelief but from belief.  Disbelief is a way of not facing what unfolds, and also disables our ability to deal with things.

When you can choose to disbelieve By Nimue Brown

There are a great many things that are subject to disbelief. Racial hatred, abuse and harassment, sexual hatred abuse and harassment, the practical and social difficulties grinding down the disabled, and the relentless misery of being poor. If I’m online any day, the odds are I’ll see someone questioning that these things happen, disbelieving victims and sufferers and offering alternative explanations.

The option to disbelieve comes from not being affected personally. So many people are so easily persuaded that if they haven’t seen it, it doesn’t happen. This means that when others try and tell them what happens, they ignore the evidence in favour of their belief, and so they still don’t see it happening.

Disbelief is most often followed by shaming and blaming. The feckless poor with their cigarettes and alcohol. The women who bring it upon themselves by having bodies and clothes and going outside. The disabled people who aren’t trying hard enough to magic themselves well. I think the worst of this is what comes up over race to try and explain away brutality, oppression and a rigged game designed to be unwinnable if you’re from the ‘wrong’ group. Often this is the worst of it because poverty is usually in there too, and the other things on the list can and do feature.

Disbelief means taking no responsibility. It means there’s no pressure to look either at your own behaviour or about the way you participate in a culture that allows this. Disbelief affirms the feeling that all your good things come from your hard work and virtue. You’re too clever to be raped, to get sick, to become poor. The illusion of safety and of being in control are comforting things.

Disbelief is also another form of misery to heap onto those already in trouble. Not only are you dealing with some vile thing, but you’re doing it surrounded by people who tell you it does not exist, is not happening, does not happen. You’ve made it up to get attention (because there’s so much glory, wealth and power to be obtained by admitting you were abused, right?). You’re lying. You’re trying to get out of something or get something for nothing or get special treatment. You’re a snowflake. You’re to blame. And when you’ve already been knocked down by something, dealing with people who refuse to believe it even exists is ghastly.

If people around you deny your reality, say your experience doesn’t exist or is your fault, that way lies madness. Being told you are the cause of the abuse you have suffered crushes your sense of self, takes away your self esteem, may make you question your own experience and your right to feel about it as you do. And of course if all you ever see is people denying that your problem is a real problem, you’ll be less likely to call it out in the first place.

If you’ve been there, it isn’t a belief issue. If you’ve seen it, you know it happens. You don’t have to question why someone would say something like that. You don’t try to figure out how it was their fault, because you know what happens. Disbelief is a luxury available only to those who do not know.

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From the ‘crisis of perception’ to the ‘systems view of life’: Guest post on sustainable thinking

December 3, 2017

https://medium.com/age-of-awareness/from-the-crisis-of-perception-to-the-systems-view-of-life-df6973a754a3   by  Daniel Christian Wahl

excerpt:

“After initially training as a zoologist and marine biologist at the University of Edinburgh and the University of California (Santa Cruz), I have spent the last 20 years of my life in search of answers to one extremely complex challenge: How can we create a more sustainable human presence on Earth?

“I still remember the day, in spring 1994, when I realized that the most effective way I could contribute to future generations being able to experience the bliss of swimming with a pod of dolphins in their natural habitat was not by continuing on my path towards becoming a marine mammal biologist, but by working in whatever small way I could to help my own species change its perspective and way of relating to life as a planetary process. We are participants in that process and our future depends on it.

“I dedicated the past two decades to investigating and learning how to apply ‘sustainable solutions’. In the process I spent time as an academic, grassroots activist, business consultant and educator, and worked with public authorities at the local, national and international (United Nations) level. I investigated, advocated and helped to implement sustainable solutions in many areas of human activity like transport, housing, community development, food production, water treatment, sustainable production and consumption, and education.

“Luckily everyday there are more sustainable solutions available to us, but applied at an inadequate scale or without paying attention to their systemic context, today’s solutions can quickly turn into tomorrow’s problems. Without the cultural ability to see our actions and the changes around us from a systemic perspective, combined with the wisdom to evaluate any proposed solutions in the context of their effects on the health and resilience of life as a whole, even well-meant attempts to create sustainability can have ill-fated results.

“Einstein’s widely quoted advice that “we cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them” seems more appropriate than ever. We are dealing with the complexity of a profound societal change and the transition towards diverse regenerative cultures as manifestations of not only a different way of being in the world, but also a different way of seeing the world.

“In a letter to Jan Christiaan Smuts, Einstein congratulated him for publishing Holism and Evolution (1926) and suggested that two concepts would shape human thinking in the next millennium, his own concept of ‘relativity’ and Smuts’s ‘holism’ defined as “the tendency in nature to form wholes that are greater than the sum of the parts through creative evolution” (Smuts, 1927).

“Holistic thinking is the new way of thinking needed to (dis)solve the problems created by reductionist thinking. But we should not over-swing the pendulum and favour holistic thinking in all circumstances over reductionist thinking. We should regard reductionism as a useful method to be applied if and when appropriate and within a whole-systems context that acknowledges the valuable contributions of diverse perspectives, as well as the limits to our knowing. We might prefer definitive answers and solutions, but what if they simply cannot be given?

“Are we chasing a mirage of certainty in a profoundly ambiguous and unpredictable world?…

… “In spring 2002 I had the good fortune to meet the physicist Fritjof Capra at Schumacher College. Capra clearly articulated something that I had intuitively known and was trying to understand better. He suggested that the ecological, environmental, social and economic crises we are facing are not separate but interconnected expressions of one single crisis: a crisis of perception. He explained how our culturally dominant worldview is informed by outdated scientific theories and a tendency to lose ourselves in the details of the perspective of a single discipline, rather than to see the ‘hidden connections’ that maintain the long-term viability of life as a whole.

The neo-Darwinist story of individuals and species in fierce competition for limited resources is an inadequate and limited conception of life. Nature sustains life by creating and nurturing communities. In today’s leading life sciences, evolution is no longer seen as a struggle for existence but as a collaborative dance and exploration of novelty. Capra pointed out that “sustainability is a dynamic process of co-evolution rather than a static state. Sustainability is a property of an entire web of relationships” (personal comment) rather than a characteristic of a single individual, company, country or species.

“The understanding that the common root cause of the multiple crises we are facing is in fact a crisis of perception offers us hope that we will be able to respond before it is too late. It suggests that if we were to employ a different way of thinking to the one that got us into this mess in the first place, we might realize how many interconnected problems can be combined in ways that point us towards a series of interconnected opportunities and systemic win-win-win solutions by addressing root-causes rather than symptoms.

Taking a systems view of life is an important step towards addressing the crisis of perception. Realizing our intimate kinship and communion with the process of life as a whole will trigger a shift in consciousness that will enable us to radically improve the quality of our lives and the health of the ecosystems and planet we inhabit. It will change the ways we relate to each other and the rest of the natural world and allow for the emergence of health as a systemic property linking human and planetary health.”

Blessings - Temple Illuminatusfelixwhywaitcrazywisdom

 

 

Solstice story by moi– #freeread Happy holiday!

December 21, 2016

Solstice of the Whirled

by Helgaleena
originally published in
A Dark Roasted Christmas Volume 2
(out of print) http://www.123rf.com/photo_15076466_infinity-spiral-from-autumn-photos-travel-and-seasons-concept.html
As it is midsummer at one end of the vajra and the longest night at the other end, I dreamed that they were in love.

Leah Whitehorse guest post- New Moon in Scorpio 2016 : Ghosts

October 30, 2016

http://www.leahwhitehorse.com/2016/10/26/new-moon-in-scorpio-october-2016-ghosts/#comment-435351

The New Moon occurs at 17:28 (UT) on the 30th October 2016 at 07°Sc43′

After all the noise of the last Aries Full Moon, this lunation feels intensely quiet. The Moon and Sun conjoined in Scorpio brings conscious and unconscious together and in this moment of inner alignment, we’re plunged into the darkest reaches of the self. In these shadowy places are our greatest fears and passions. It’s the terror of death and sometimes the terror to really LIVE. Scorpio rules those kinds of endings that are absolutely final, the loss that we must grief for and accept. It rules that heady moment when there is only skin against skin and nothing in between you and your lover. There’s nothing insipid about Scorpio, what it feels, it feels down to the bone. It’s raw and unbridled and has a curious magnetic compulsion that draws us deeper…

This New Moon falls just before Samhain/Hallowe’en as well as All Souls and All Saint’s and the Mexican Day of the Dead. At this time of year, as the nights begin to draw in and the foliage withers and dies, Death comes knocking in the form of little kids dressed up in scary costumes and we carve pumpkins to shoo off ‘The Devil’. Horror films play on a loop and Mars square to Uranus in this chart is like the electric shock of surprise as the big bad leaps into view and you fall giggling in a heap, hair still standing on end. Death and fear are uniquely bound. It’s fear of the unknown that gets us but Scorpio knows that the path of the unknown is the one to take, especially as the Moon and Sun are sextile the North Node, pointing the way towards evolution.

Those of us who practice a spiritual tradition may visit the grave of loved ones or create ancestor altars to honour those who have passed. Asteroids Memoria and Photographica oppose this New Moon so going through old photographs and stirring memories may feel challenging but also offers great healing during this time.

This lunation is conjunct Mercury who in Roman mythology was a psychopomp, escorting the souls of the dead to the heavens. Mercury’s close proximity to this Moon means that maybe we’re talking or thinking about those who have passed – or talking with them. The Moon and Mercury are both trine to Neptune so this Moon is a spiritual communion between ourselves and the other worlds beyond. Whether the connection is to the deceased or to deities, angels or guides, the veil between the worlds is even thinner than normal at this time of year. Dreams now may be especially vivid and spirit contact too may come through the dream state. During this lunation, we’re called to listen to the space between the sounds, the whispers of the soul. Communication of all kinds lingers in the ether and if we are receptive, there’s much we can learn. Listen to your intuition.

The Moon is on the Sabian symbol :-

A Calm Lake Bathed In Moonlight

Make time for reflection. Not only is there the opportunity to connect with souls who once trod the Earth but other old ghosts may come calling from deep within the psyche. Don’t be afraid. These spectres of the past are part of your history. Send back healing to bygone years if necessary. There is nothing to control, nothing to fear. In life and death, all is well. Make peace with your ghosts.

mistypath1-e1448278855414

Our Ignorance: Ipsos MORI | Poll | Perceptions are not reality: Things the world gets wrong

November 13, 2014

Ipsos MORI | Poll | Perceptions are not reality: Things the world gets wrong.

http://www.alternet.org/story/148826/16_of_the_dumbest_things_americans_believe_–_and_the_right-wing_lies_behind_them