Posts Tagged ‘wisdom’

Ephemera: June’s Full Moon. The Moon Of Horses : Tadgh guest post

June 17, 2019

Ephemera: June’s Full Moon. The Moon Of Horses

 

excerpt:

 

…This one will be in its fullness on Monday, 17 June 2019, in the constellation of Sagittarius, low in the south-southern-eastern sky in the northern hemisphere.

Some will know this full moon as the Strawberry moon, to me and the ancient and latter-day Celts and Druids it is the Moon of Horses, to Wiccans many call is the Dyad Moon, and the Chinese people call it the Lotus Moon. In the southern hemisphere where the seasons are switched this full moon is known as the Oak Moon, Cold Moon, or the Long Night’s Moon.

The moon is a silver pin-head vast, that holds the heaven’s tent-hangings fast. -William R. Alger, ‘The Use of the Moon’

The moon was so important to ancient cultures, and even so today to those who understand, or revere nature and the old ways. But, whatever name you call it, the full moon is a time for celebration: perhaps by walking in the light of the full moon (and have you ever seen your moon-shadow?) and pondering its awesomeness, raising a glass of wine to its glory, meditating on the Moon-Giver, or reciting liturgy or a poem in its honour…

yourjourney

If you go to Tadgh’s blog, he has shared one of his own poems to the goddess Arianrhod …

Ephemera: June’s Full Moon. The Moon Of Horses

I am a lunar person myself, and my Grove rituals reflect this frequently.   Because it lies so near to the Solstice, this June moon feels extra significant and joyous.

Lately I found an excellent book called Moon Phase Astrology, by Raven Kaldera (Destiny Books 2011).   He carefully explains three different ways of relating to lunar phases before delving into the significance of each, including the ‘moon-shadows’ imparted by major planetary aspects to the moon.

         1.   Most online tools will use an Astronomical method, where the four primary phases of the Moon (New, 1st Quarter, Full, Last Quarter) are specific instants in time, and the waxing and waning phases describe the entirety of the transition between primary phases…

             2.   The Astrological method of moon phase calculation divides the lunar cycle into eight equal parts approx. 3.7 days long.  The four primary phases begin at the precise instant of the astronomical moon phase, and the waxing and waning phases begin exactly halfway between… if you were born even a few minutes before the moon was at its fullest, then from an astrological perspective you were born under the Gibbous Moon….

     3. To many people, this astrological method doesn’t feel quite right.  They may consider the Full Moon to be the three days when the moon looks the fullest. This can be called the Natural method of moon phase calculation, where the moon is considered to be in each phase for a day or so on either side of the Astronomical moon phase, and there isn’t a specific moment when the phase changes from Gibbous to Full, or Full to Disseminating…

Kaldera pp. 14-15

If he were also covering Vedic astrology of the Moon, he’d find yet another method of division. Chandra, the Moon God, has 27 feminine consorts, known as Nakshatras, who correspond to the phases of the Moon.

List of Nakshatras   

Chinese astrology referred to this division of  a lunar month as the 28 Mansions of the Moon.  They further assigned the lunar month to four quarters of the sky, each associated with a color, much as Native Americans assigned colors to the four directions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twenty-Eight_Mansions

 

The story of balance between the solar and lunar calendars in the civilization we find ourselves in today is  complicated still more if we try to pin down our Moon , with all its affinity for our lymph and our liquids,  to such precise measures.  Whatever system we may use to differentiate one Moon from the next, it will also have to obviously correspond to the moon we are seeing and feeling NOW, in the present moment.

This one is in Sagittarius,  mutable fire, scholar and explorer, centaur with bow and nocked arrow.  The week is only beginning, but we run forward as day by day the Sun reaches the Longest Day at its end, and Moon wanes into the background once again, veiled by the shadow of Earth.

Endings and beginnings are constant.  Which one is now happening to you?  Probably both.

 

 

 

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imbolc blessing from @ADFDruidry

February 5, 2019

Earth Mother,

Spirits of Inspiration,

Ancestors,

Nature Spirits,

Shining Ones,

Let me be creative;

Let fertility of mind, Body, And spirit

Be like a cornucopia

Where all good things come

From me And to me.

Let fertility nourish my Way.

And let bounty be my gift.

So Be It.

flame

dypodkdx0ail66y

 

https://twitter.com/adfdruidry/status/1092800264799703042/photo/1

 

(also happy Lunar New Year of the Pig)

guest re-post: Herman Hesse on trees

February 3, 2019

Herman Hesse on trees  

When a tree is cut down and reveals its naked death-wound to the sun, one can read its whole history in the luminous, inscribed disk of its trunk: in the rings of its years, its scars, all the struggle, all the suffering, all the sickness, all the happiness and prosperity stand truly written, the narrow years and the luxurious years, the attacks withstood, the storms endured. And every young farmboy knows that the hardest and noblest wood has the narrowest rings, that high on the mountains and in continuing danger the most indestructible, the strongest, the ideal trees grow.

Trees are sanctuaries. Whoever knows how to speak to them, whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth. They do not preach learning and precepts, they preach, undeterred by particulars, the ancient law of life.

A tree says: A kernel is hidden in me, a spark, a thought, I am life from eternal life. The attempt and the risk that the eternal mother took with me is unique, unique the form and veins of my skin, unique the smallest play of leaves in my branches and the smallest scar on my bark. I was made to form and reveal the eternal in my smallest special detail.

A tree says: My strength is trust. I know nothing about my fathers, I know nothing about the thousand children that every year spring out of me. I live out the secret of my seed to the very end, and I care for nothing else. I trust that God is in me. I trust that my labor is holy. Out of this trust I live. When we are stricken and cannot bear our lives any longer, then a tree has something to say to us: Be still! Be still! Look at me! Life is not easy, life is not difficult. Those are childish thoughts. Let God speak within you, and your thoughts will grow silent. You are anxious because your path leads away from mother and home. But every step and every day lead you back again to the mother. Home is neither here nor there. Home is within you, or home is nowhere at all.

A longing to wander tears my heart when I hear trees rustling in the wind at evening. If one listens to them silently for a long time, this longing reveals its kernel, its meaning. It is not so much a matter of escaping from one’s suffering, though it may seem to be so. It is a longing for home, for a memory of the mother, for new metaphors for life. It leads home. Every path leads homeward, every step is birth, every step is death, every grave is mother.

So the tree rustles in the evening, when we stand uneasy before our own childish thoughts: Trees have long thoughts, long-breathing and restful, just as they have longer lives than ours. They are wiser than we are, as long as we do not listen to them. But when we have learned how to listen to trees, then the brevity and the quickness and the childlike hastiness of our thoughts achieve an incomparable joy. Whoever has learned how to listen to trees no longer wants to be a tree. He wants to be nothing except what he is. That is home. That is happiness.

~ Hermann Hesse

via Philip Carr-Gomm

the-wind-garden-hero

Be more than a visitor: Philip Carr-Gomm guest post

January 23, 2019

I was saddened to hear about the death of the poet Mary Oliver this week. Her poetry so beautifully explores the connection between the human and natural world, reminding us that there is no separation, that nature is our home in the deepest, most spiritual sense. I read a wonderful quote in the Independent that comes from her book of essays, Long Life. In it, she says of herself,

In my outward appearance and life habits I hardly change — there’s never been a day that my friends haven’t been able to say, and at a distance, ‘There’s Oliver, still standing around in the weeds. There she is, still scribbling in her notebook’.
But, at the center: I am shaking; I am flashing like tinsel.

This speaks so brilliantly of her skill to help us glimpse the extraordinary in the seemingly ordinary, both within us and around us; to crack open our dull vision and shine a light upon the magic of this world, enabling us to feel more intimately and powerfully a part of life. The body of work she has left us, is a true gift.

When Death Comes

When death comes
like the hungry bear in autumn;
when death comes and takes all the bright coins from his purse

to buy me, and snaps the purse shut;
when death comes
like the measle-pox

when death comes
like an iceberg between the shoulder blades,

I want to step through the door full of curiosity, wondering:
what is it going to be like, that cottage of darkness?

And therefore I look upon everything
as a brotherhood and a sisterhood,
and I look upon time as no more than an idea,
and I consider eternity as another possibility,

and I think of each life as a flower, as common
as a field daisy, and as singular,

and each name a comfortable music in the mouth,
tending, as all music does, toward silence,

and each body a lion of courage, and something
precious to the earth.

When it’s over, I want to say all my life
I was a bride married to amazement.
I was the bridegroom, taking the world into my arms.

When it’s over, I don’t want to wonder
if I have made of my life something particular, and real.

I don’t want to find myself sighing and frightened,
or full of argument.

I don’t want to end up simply having visited this world.

~ Mary Oliver

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https://www.philipcarr-gomm.com/be-more-than-a-visitor/

 

 

THE SNAKE AND THE SAW : Guest re-post

December 26, 2018

SUCCESS INSPIRERS' WORLD

THE SNAKE AND THE SAW

A SNAKE penetrated into a carpentry workshop. As it slipped, it passed over a SAW and got slightly wounded. Suddenly, it turned and bit the SAW, and biting the SAW, the SNAKE seriously got wounded in its mouth!

Then not understanding what was happening and thinking that the SAW was attacking “him,” it decided to roll around the SAW to suffocate it with all its body by squeezing it with all its strength, but it ended up being killed by the SAW!!!

inspiring-story-about-snakes-and-a-chainsaw.png

Sometimes we immediately react in anger to hurt those who have harmed us, but we realize later that after all we are hurting ourselves.

Similarly, In life it is better sometimes to ignore situations, ignore people, ignore their behavior, their words….those that hurt us !!

Sometimes it is better not to react so as not to suffer the consequences that can sometimes be…

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Thinking like a Swamp Thing? Developing a Plant Politics and Ethics (Part 2)

December 16, 2018

pOfTrees

Reading Super Heroes Politically

This is the second of a three part post about the politics and philosophic aspects of Alan Moore’s run on Swamp Thing. If you missed the first part you can find it here. These posts are all part of a rough draft I wrote for a conference and any comments or feedback would really helpful in moving forward.


Thinking like a Swamp Thing: Developing a Plant Politics and Ethics

With Swamp Thing’s human foundation removed by Alan Moore the character becomes, as Colin Beinke notes, an example of the Green Man literary trope. The Green Man is a folklore character that represents the struggle of the natural world against the destructive tide of civilization. Examples of the Green Man are: Dionysus, Pan, Jack-in-the-green, the Green Knight and most recently, the Jolly Green Giant. As Beinke states, “…the Green Man is ‘adopted’ by the cultural imagination of each subsequent ‘society and…

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guest post: Lughnasadh with OBOD’s Philip Carr-Gomm

August 8, 2018

Lughnasadh and tiredness: a meditation

Lughnasadh

 

Water lilies

 

the-wind-garden-hero

adfsigil

Truth and Stories

June 6, 2018

flame

There is an expression for communicating among humans– ‘breaking news’.   It refers to very fresh, not old, information that is sufficiently significant that the old reality, the older news, will be changed by it.  Like a newborn emerging from its eggshell it presents a fresh perspective upon our shared world.

Often our view of the world is a bit stale and habitual. Habits are a source of comfort , as old friends.  However, since things constantly change with the passage of time, it may be necessary to freshen up our grasp of reality, of truth itself, if our position isn’t comfy anymore, if our rear ends sag too near the road upon the life path.

What do you take as a ‘given’ that might not be so?  Is there anything that simply won’t ‘come true’ no matter how hard you believe it?  Have you begun to no longer trust your own thoughts, your own feelings, maybe your own senses?  Danger, danger!  No matter how the New Agers sell the power of ‘manifesting your perfect life’.  it has to be do-able here upon the Earth-Mother. 

It may be time to still yourself, ground yourself, reconnect with your own heart and soul, where in truth we are already part of perfection.  Make certain that the news you pass along is truth.

There is also a Druid slogan, ‘Truth against the world.’  That truth is known as Awen,  insight into the eternal and immutable.  All things that manifest can only do so to the extent that they are part of that Truth.  Check it against inner Awen, if you have come across it out in the World.

 

Salman Rushdie has written things that ring true, even presented as fiction, enough to perturb many people whose perspectives are a bit rigid.  He wrote recently about the dilemma of #fakenews  that can get its readers or listeners confused about how our world actually is.  Those who shout loudest that something is #fakenews may actually want us to instead stop thinking and trust the brand of expertise or authority they are touting at the moment.

 

“I have argued, for much of my life as a writer, that the breakdown in the old agreements about reality is now the most significant reality, and that the world can perhaps best be explained in terms of conflicting and often incompatible narratives. In Kashmir and in the Middle East, and in the battle between progressive America and Trumpistan, we see examples of such incompatibilities. I have also maintained that the consequences of this new, argumentative, even polemical attitude to the real has profound implications for literature—that we can’t, or ought not to, pretend it isn’t there. I believe that the influence on public discourse of more, and more varied, voices has been a good thing, enriching our literatures and making more complex our understanding of the world.

“And yet I now face, as we all do, a genuine conundrum. How can we argue, on the one hand, that modern reality has become necessarily multidimensional, fractured and fragmented, and, on the other hand, that reality is a very particular thing, an unarguable series of things that are so, which needs to be defended against the attacks of, to be frank, the things that are not so, which are being promulgated by, let’s say, the Modi Administration in India, the Brexit crew in the U.K., and the President of the United States? How to combat the worst aspects of the Internet, that parallel universe in which important information and total garbage coexist, side by side, with, apparently, the same levels of authority, making it harder than ever for people to tell them apart? How to resist the erosion in the public acceptance of “basic facts,” scientific facts, evidence-supported facts about, say, climate change or inoculations for children? How to combat the political demagoguery that seeks to do what authoritarians have always wanted—to undermine the public’s belief in evidence, and to say to their electorates, in effect, “Believe nothing except me, for I am the truth”? What do we do about that? And what, specifically, might be the role of art, and the role of the literary arts in particular?”

Salman Rushdie

We tell a story of ourselves by the very act of living our lives each day.  Nimue Brown has written about that recently, too.  Because we live with other humans, and in fact need to do it that way,  there is always a balancing act between their realities and ours.  Sometimes, they conflict badly enough that one story will try to over-write another.  Danger, Danger again!  How much of your own truth are you willing to amend just to keep the peace?

“People will fight and kill to protect their stories and their take on reality, even when those stories are clearly harming them. As the person breaking the story, you are perhaps more likely to be seen as the destructive oppressor, and not the rescuing angel you may imagine yourself to be. Those still in the story may simply recast you so that they can keep the story going. “You used to be such a nice little girl. I don’t know what went wrong.”

“Sometimes, the only way out of a story is to break away from the people whose story it is. Sometimes, the only option is to play the role consciously and then escape into spaces where you can properly be yourself. Sometimes to do that, a safe house is required, a new identity, police protection. Sometimes you have to ask difficult questions about the price of your relationships, and the implications of leaving them. People can die as a consequence of misjudging this.

“If you call out a story as a lie, even if you can evidence it, people may fight you. They may fire you, take you to court, lie about you, attack you on social media. They may deprive you of key resources. If you refuse to play your allotted role you may be harassed, ridiculed, threatened or abandoned. You have no control over how other people respond when you stop acting in line with their story.

“But you have the right to live your own life, and you have the right to be safe. So, if you’re wrecking a story, plan your escape routes first – more or less literally as required. Do some risk assessment. Consider the consequences. Try to break the story as calmly as you can, with minimal drama. There is nothing like drama to keep a story moving, because even as you think you’re resisting it, you can find the energy of it being sucked in and used to reinforce the existing story. You were always a useless child. Now you’re upsetting everyone with this stupid idea that you can do something. It’s all your fault… These are the outcomes to avoid.

“It’s natural to want justice, to want recognition. It’s reasonable to want the people who have miscast you to realise their mistakes. It’s also very likely that you won’t get that. If you choose to stay and fight, you may be pulled back into the old story. Sometimes, it is better to go quietly and start a new story of your own somewhere else.”

Nimue Brown  

Sometimes another person is so afraid of your view that they insist upon calling you wrong, or a ‘bad guy’, even insisting that what you see with your own eyes, hear with your own ears, is not so.  Danger, Danger yet again.   If your own senses cannot be relied upon you are severely crippled for handling living. Best to stay true to them, and to yourself, and get far away from one who can only thwart you.  They are ‘gas-lighting’. If you remain with this person,  soon everything will be labeled as your fault.  It never helps to feel that way;  the person who constantly refuses to take responsibility for their own truth will try to get another to do it for them.

The world is our teacher.  Sometimes it is our culture that presents itself, other times we can go right to the Source, to Nature.  Nature has no bias.  No matter what direction a culture may sway us, Nature will not care.  The better a culture harmonizes with Nature, the more successful it proves.  But too often cultures are ossified and losing touch with Nature; they are the ones that are most concerned with the obedience of individuals.

It is one thing to observe and to learn, and another to be a mere follower who depends on the views of another.  If your world has become a prison of fears and prejudices,  it’s time for an open door policy and a good sweeping out.

The Third Reich built its powers by scapegoating minorities and poisoning the public opinion to allow for atrocities against ‘lesser’ populations. Secrecy shielded the worst of the genocide from ordinary citizens. Lies of omission were very common.

Truth is not meant to be hidden.  There is nothing to be ashamed of.  If you have anything in your story that you think you need to hide, please heal it.  If someone else in your world gives you shame for a thing,  do not accept that present.  Or if you find it has been delivered, put it in the compost.

“In Germany, after the Second World War, the authors of what was called Trümmerliteratur, or “rubble literature,” felt the need to rebuild their language, poisoned by Nazism, as well as their country, which lay in ruins. They understood that reality, truth, needed to be reconstructed from the ground up, with new language, just as the bombed cities needed to be rebuilt. I think we can learn from their example. We stand once again, though for different reasons, in the midst of the rubble of the truth. And it is for us—writers, thinkers, journalists, philosophers—to undertake the task of rebuilding our readers’ belief in reality, their faith in the truth. And to do it with new language, from the ground up.”

Salman Rushdie

If you find yourself unsure about a story which is not presented as fiction, but as truth,  be careful of it.  Even the people you trust can be fooled.  Try tossing it all against the wall and see what sticks.

adfsigil

peace, peace, peace

Spending a year with Dame Judi Dench’s trees

March 22, 2018

Judi Dench: My Passion For Trees Full Program

They begin at winter, the traditional Druid year’s beginning.   It’s excellent.

Groves are communities indeed,  even scientifically.  On World Water Day, blessings from my grove to yours.

the-wind-garden-hero

Spring Cleaning yoga

March 1, 2018

This is a re-post from earlier in the Druid blog, which was inspired by finding the article below.   Be certain to follow the link to my original article, inset, as well as checking out the hints in Om Times.

 

 

The Key to Removing Unwanted Entities https://omtimes.com/2016/07/key-removing-unwanted-entities/

Helgaleena

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From Chakra Healing and Karmic Awareness by Keith Sherwood (2005 Llewellyn Publications, St. Paul Mn USA)  :

“Below you will find a series of commitments that will sever your links to non-physical beings outside your energy field… and will bring you in accord with the will of the Self as it emerges through your higher and lower mind. In addition, these commitments will safeguard your energy field from any further intrusions of non-physical beings by strengthening your boundaries on all worlds anbd dimensions, including the world of spirit, intellect, soul, lower mind, world of the chakras, and the levels of the splenic chakras.

If you know it’s appropriate to make these commitments and you know you will keep them permanently, then simply read the commitments below, repeat them out loud, and affirm, “I agree to these three commitments.”

The first is:

“If  I have given permission or inadvertently given…

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